'Rocketman' Review: Elton John Biopic Is A Song-And-Dance Spectacular Rocketman finds ways to buck convention, even in the familiar framework of the rock biopic. The operatic excesses are balanced by a powerful sense of melancholy in this marvelous biographical musical.
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Elton John Biopic 'Rocketman' Is A Surprising Song-And-Dance Spectacular

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Elton John Biopic 'Rocketman' Is A Surprising Song-And-Dance Spectacular

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Movie Reviews

Elton John Biopic 'Rocketman' Is A Surprising Song-And-Dance Spectacular

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. The young Taron Egerton performed a cover of Elton John's "I'm Still Standing" in the 2016 animated musical "Sing." Now Egerton has been cast as John himself in the new live-action musical-drama "Rocketman." It was directed by Dexter Fletcher, who did uncredited work on last year's Freddie Mercury biopic "Bohemian Rhapsody." Film critic Justin Chang has this review.

JUSTIN CHANG, BYLINE: The first time we see Elton John in "Rocketman," he's wearing a spangly, red, devil costume with sharp horns and enormous wings. It's one of the many glorious, glittery things we see him wear in the movie. Although, on this occasion, he isn't dressed for a concert. It's around 1990. And Elton, played by Taron Egerton, is attending a group therapy session. He may be one of the world's most successful rock stars, but he's also being eaten alive by sex addiction and substance abuse and also by feelings of abandonment that go back to his childhood.

No one who's seen a movie about a popular musician will be surprised by any of this or by the way "Rocketman" unfolds its story as a series of extended flashbacks. But even within that familiar framework, the movie finds surprising ways to buck convention. The colors are bright and kaleidoscopic, but the tone is beautifully modulated. The operatic excesses are balanced by a powerful sense of melancholy. The group therapy framing device works especially well. The sight of Elton in all that defiant plumage is ludicrous, marvelous and strangely poignant - all words you might apply to the movie itself.

As directed by Dexter Fletcher from a script by Lee Hall, "Rocketman" isn't just a musician's biopic; it's a biographical musical. Conceived as a surreal song and dance spectacular, it's a delirious blur of truth and artifice, convention and daring. John’s greatest hits — from “Your Song” and “Tiny Dancer” to “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” and “I’m Still Standing” - are treated not just as career milestones but as full-blown numbers. The first one is “The B**** Is Back,” repurposed here as an anthem of boyhood defiance for Elton, born Reginald Dwight, as he grows up in 1950s London with his unhappily married parents. Bryce Dallas Howard plays his mother with a series of exhausted eye-rolls, even when Reggie begins to show signs of prodigious musical talent.

Reggie grows up in a flash, rebrands himself as Elton John, and meets his lifelong collaborator, the lyricist Bernie Taupin, wonderfully played by Jamie Bell. The movie's most stirring scene finds Elton improvising at the piano, and the immortal melody to “Your Song” comes pouring out of his fingertips. It's his song of unrequited love for Bernie, who will stand by him through thick and thin, even after Elton falls into a toxic relationship with a manipulative manager, John Reid, played by Richard Madden of "Game Of Thrones" fame.

It may be a little reductive to use John's music as a form of narrative shorthand, but it also works like gangbusters. We're reminded of just how soulful and emotionally malleable that music is. In one of the more blatant but inspired artistic liberties, Elton makes his stateside debut at the Troubadour in LA with a gravity-defying performance of "Crocodile Rock" - never mind that it's 1970, two years before he and Taupin would write that song in real life.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "ROCKETMAN")

TARON EGERTON: (As Elton John, singing) I remember when the rock was young. Me and Suzie had so much fun. Holding hands and skimming stones. Had an old gold Chevy and a place of my own. But the biggest kick I ever got was doing a thing called the crocodile rock. While the other kids were rocking around the clock, we were hopping and bopping to the crocodile rock. Well, crocodile rocking is something shocking. When your feet just can't keep still. I never....

CHANG: That's Taron Egerton doing his own singing. And while the 29-year-old actor isn't a perfect physical match for Elton John, it hardly matters. Rather than going for showy mimicry, Edgerton underplays, locating subtle depths of feeling in a figure known for his flamboyance. He retains a firm grip on the character, even when he begins his downward spiral, climaxing with his 1975 suicide attempt, when he overdoses on Valium and plunges into his swimming pool. It's here that director Fletcher unleashes the song "Rocket Man" itself, staged as a gorgeously lyrical underwater fantasy.

Moments like that give the movie a coherence and fluidity that eluded the much more slapdash "Bohemian Rhapsody," which Fletcher completed after its director, Bryan Singer, was fired mid-production. It's hard not to compare the two. Like "Rhapsody," "Rocketman" is a portrait of an LGBT glam rock icon who repressed his sexuality but ultimately couldn't keep it out of the spotlight. This movie, to its credit, takes a much more intimate and empathetic view of its subject's romantic life.

That's not to say that "Rocketman" doesn't have its overly processed, sanitized moments. You may nod your head somewhat dutifully as the story tumbles through its rise-and-fall-and-rise-again trajectory. But as Elton John's music itself reminds us, even the most familiar tune can take on new resonance. In the movie's most aching moments, Elton seems to be singing not to others but himself, as if to suggest that even the most universal pleasures often have intensely personal roots. Before it was your song, it was his.

BIANCULLI: Justin Chang is a film critic for The L.A. Times.

On Monday's show, we talk about the sustainable food revolution with Amanda Little, author of "The Fate Of Food." She writes about efforts to create a global food supply for a world that will be hotter, drier and more crowded. It includes meat cultured in a lab, 3D printer food, aquaculture and indoor vertical farming. Hope you can join us.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ROCKET MAN")

ELTON JOHN: (Singing) And I think it's going to be a long, long time until touch down brings me round again to find I'm not the man they think I am at home. Oh, no, no, no. I'm a rocket man. Rocket man burning out his fuse up here alone.

BIANCULLI: FRESH AIR's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our technical director and engineer is Audrey Bentham with additional engineering support from Joyce Lieberman and Julian Herzfeld. Our associate producer for digital media is Molly Seavy-Nesper. Roberta Shorrock directs the show. For Terry Gross, I'm David Bianculli.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ROCKET MAN")

JOHN: (Singing) I'm a rocket man. Rocket man burning out his fuse up here alone.

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