You're The Only Ten-I-See In this guessing game nominally inspired by Tennessee, contestants guess whether a quantity is more than/greater than/higher than ten or fewer than/less than/lower than ten.
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You're The Only Ten-I-See

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You're The Only Ten-I-See

You're The Only Ten-I-See

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JONATHAN COULTON: This is NPR's ASK ME ANOTHER in Nashville, Tenn. I'm Jonathan Coulton. Now here's your host, Ophira Eisenberg.

(APPLAUSE)

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Thank you, Jonathan. Before our break, we met our contestants Peter and Jarrod. Let's go to your next game. The real reason we came back to Nashville is to give us an excuse to play another round of a guessing game we call You're The Only Ten-I-See.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: It's simple. All you have to do is tell us whether the numerical value we're asking about is higher or lower than 10.

COULTON: Ring in to answer, but be careful. If you're wrong, your opponent will automatically get the point.

EISENBERG: Jarrod, stay in the lead, and you are in the final round. Peter, you need to get more points or you have to answer all of the emails that we're going to get about the fact that it is grammatically correct to say more than and fewer than rather than more than and less than. And trust me; we are going to get more than ten emails.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: OK. Here we go. As of this recording, the number of women serving in the U.S. Senate - higher or lower than 10.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jarrod.

JARROD WALKER: Higher.

EISENBERG: That is correct. For a bonus point, how many?

WALKER: I'm going to say 22.

EISENBERG: Very close - the answer is 25.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I would have also accepted, not enough.

(APPLAUSE)

COULTON: As of this recording, the number of movies that grossed more than $2 billion worldwide - not adjusted for inflation - higher or lower than 10.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

COULTON: Peter.

PETER MURREY: Less.

COULTON: That's right. There are fewer movies that grossed more than $2 billion worldwide.

MURREY: I'm sending the emails early.

EISENBERG: OK, good. Good.

COULTON: I know. I appreciate it. And for a bonus point, how many movies were there?

MURREY: Four.

COULTON: Oh, very close - it was five. They are "Avatar," "Avengers: End Game," "Titanic," "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" and "Avengers: Infinity War."

EISENBERG: Wow - space, comic books, fantasy, sinking ship from history.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Everybody loves it.

EISENBERG: According to the nutritional information provided by McDonald's, the number of Chicken McNuggets you'd have to eat to consume 2,000 calories - higher or lower than 10.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Peter.

MURREY: Lower.

EISENBERG: I'm sorry. That is incorrect. I know. The answer is higher than 10. That means Jarrod gets the point. Jarrod, for a bonus point, how many McNuggets would you have to eat to get to 2,000 calories?

WALKER: Sixteen.

EISENBERG: Good guess. The answer is 45.

WALKER: Wow.

EISENBERG: You have to - yeah. They're 45 calories apiece, so...

COULTON: It's a low-cal food.

EISENBERG: It's a low-cal food.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: Go ahead and eat 45 chicken nuggets.

COULTON: I mean, you're done for the day, but...

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: I just burned 45 calories thinking about it.

COULTON: Yeah.

EISENBERG: All right, this is your last clue - King Tut's age when he became pharaoh.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jarrod.

WALKER: It'd be lower.

EISENBERG: That is correct. For a bonus point, how old was he?

WALKER: I think he was 8.

EISENBERG: So close - he was 9. I know. At 9, you learn how to balance a country's budget.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: OK. That was very close. Jarrod is going to our final round.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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