Hope Seen at North Korean Nuclear Talks Six-party talks on North Korea's nuclear program, under way in Beijing, yield optimism that North Korea will cooperate. The reclusive regime is hinting that it may accept in principle the initial steps of a Chinese proposal to rein in North Korea's nuclear ambitions.
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Hope Seen at North Korean Nuclear Talks

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Hope Seen at North Korean Nuclear Talks

Hope Seen at North Korean Nuclear Talks

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Americans are also trying to get up to speed on what's happening in North Korea, and negotiations over its nuclear weapons program entered a second day today. The American goal is to get the North to give up that program.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Beijing.

ANTHONY KUHN, Host:

Nuclear negotiators from the U.S., North and South Korea, China, Russia, and Japan spent the day discussing a draft agreement produced by host nation China. Diplomats say the U.S. and North Korea's neighbors are pushing for North Korea to shut down its main nuclear reactor at Yongbyon and submit to international inspections.

CHRISTOPHER HILL: We've gone 18 months without anything, and so we have to pick up the pace.

KUHN: U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill said he wanted to see concrete actions on North Korea's 2005 pledge to scrap its nuclear programs.

HILL: I really think this is a tough first step. But if we can get this first step, I think it'll really help us with the next step.

KUHN: Hill has said he hopes initial measures could be implemented in a couple of months. North Korea's negotiator, Kim Gye Gwan, said yesterday that his country was willing to take some initial measures, but he said it depended on whether Washington gave up its hostile policies towards Pyongyang. The talks are expected to continue into the weekend.

Anthony Kuhn, NPR News, Beijing.

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