A Diamond In The Rough (In Arkansas) NPR's Leila Fadel talks with Miranda Hollingshead about her gem of a visit to an Arkansas state park.
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A Diamond In The Rough (In Arkansas)

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A Diamond In The Rough (In Arkansas)

A Diamond In The Rough (In Arkansas)

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LEILA FADEL, HOST:

Not every trip to a state park goes as well as a recent one did for Miranda Hollingshead of Bogata, Texas. Then again, Crater of Diamonds State Park in southwest Arkansas isn't your average tree-covered campground. It's got a 37-acre plowed field perfect for digging. And as the website says, finders, keepers. About a week ago, Hollingshead was at the park with her mom and sister and her two little kids.

MIRANDA HOLLINGSHEAD: They kept just throwing dirt everywhere, so I was getting frustrated (laughter). And I was like, OK. Just keep the dirt in the bucket, like, you know? And finally, me and my sister looked at each other. And she's like, what are we doing here? I was like, I don't even know. Like, we don't even know what we're looking for. And I was like, I'm just going to pull up YouTube. And I typed in, you know, Crater of Diamonds, Arkansas, how to find diamonds, on YouTube. And the first video pulled up. I clicked on it. And when I looked back down, there was a diamond by my finger. And I just picked it up. And I was like, oh, my God.

FADEL: Oh, my God.

HOLLINGSHEAD: Yeah. I turned to my mother, who's all the way across the field on the other side of the field. And I'm like, I think I found one. And my little sister, who was with me, she was like, no, you didn't. It's just glass. Like, I was, like, no. It's a diamond (laughter) so...

FADEL: And it was. So tell us about the diamond.

HOLLINGSHEAD: It was. It had, like, this really pretty yellow sheen to it. And I thought it was too shiny to be, you know, a diamond, especially a rough diamond. It's about the size of a - like, a No. 2 pencil eraser if you pulled the pencil eraser out of the metal.

FADEL: So I read that you got to choose a name for your diamond.

HOLLINGSHEAD: I did. And I couldn't choose a name because I was, like, well, that's weird. The only thing I've had to name is my kids. So I turned to my son. He's 4. I say, hey, bud. I said, what do you want to name it? And he's like, Caro. I was like, Caro? Well, like, all right. It's unique. You're unique - whatever. Like, I guess we're going to name it The Caro. And my mother had come up. And she goes, would you name it The Avenger? And I was like, why would I name it The Avenger? And she's like, really? Well, I love superheroes. My kids love superheroes, all the movies. We watch them all together, you know, "The Avengers." And I was like, you know what? That's a good point. Let's use The Caro Avenger so that way my mom and my son's names they chose were both on it.

FADEL: What are you going to do with it?

HOLLINGSHEAD: If I keep it, I'm most likely going to get it cut into two different diamonds and make future engagement rings for, like, my kids. But then I don't know what I'm going to do if I end up having more kids so...

FADEL: You'll just have to go find another diamond.

HOLLINGSHEAD: Yeah. I guess so. My mom now is saying, you know, now that we know that it's so close to our homes - she's like, we should go, like, at least once every other week.

FADEL: (Laughter).

HOLLINGSHEAD: I was like, yeah. I'm down now, (laughter) like, you know? Let's go.

FADEL: That's Miranda Hollingshead of the Bogata, Texas. She found a 3.72 carat diamond at Crater of Diamond State Park. Thank you so much.

HOLLINGSHEAD: All right. Thank you.

(SOUNDBITE OF UNIDENTIFIED SONG)

UNIDENTIFIED SINGER: (Singing) And I'll digging in the dirt for that Arkansas diamond. I got to make own good luck.

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