VR At Work: Employers Embrace Virtual Reality For Workplace Training In the virtual world, cashiers are taught to show greater empathy, mechanics learn to repair planes and retail workers experience how to deal with armed robbery.
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Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

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Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

Virtual Reality Goes To Work, Helping Train Employees

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On-the-job training in virtual reality - for millions of workers, it is increasingly becoming an important learning tool. In the VR world, cashiers are taught to show greater empathy, mechanics learn to repair planes and employees are shown how to deal with an active shooter. This year, companies are really embracing this high-tech trend, as NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports.

YUKI NOGUCHI, BYLINE: Derek Belch is the CEO and founder of Silicon Valley startup STRIVR, one of several companies using virtual reality for workplace training. He hands me a goggle-like headset that encircles my eyes and ears.

But I feel like I should just try it.

DEREK BELCH: You want to do a demo to start?

NOGUCHI: Yeah.

BELCH: Yeah. Let's do it.

NOGUCHI: Inside this alternate world, I'm a Verizon store manager. I walk through a parking lot and then unlock the store, unaware of a masked robber right behind me.

(SOUNDBITE OF VR SIMULATION)

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #1: (As Robber #1) All right. Stop. Don't move.

NOGUCHI: As I react, the technology gauges my reaction - how I move, where I look.

(SOUNDBITE OF VR SIMULATION)

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #1: (As Robber #1) Come on. Let's go.

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #2: (As Robber #2) Come on.

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #3: (As Robber #3) Give us the inventory.

NOGUCHI: I'm flustered and make a mistake. I turn to face the gunman.

(SOUNDBITE OF VR SIMULATION)

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #2: (As Robber #2) Move.

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #4: (As employee, wailing).

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR #1: (As Robber #1) What are you doing? Turn around.

NOGUCHI: An employee wails in front of me. I feel paralyzed, like I probably would be in real life. This is the teachable moment employers want. A screen pops up prompting me to make choices - unlock the safe, hand over merchandise. It's learning in real time under duress.

NOGUCHI: All right. So what do I do?

BELCH: All right. So he just pointed the gun in your face. I can see you're a little freaked out right now.

NOGUCHI: Yeah.

BELCH: I can see the goose bumps on your arm.

NOGUCHI: Right. I feel like I'm sweating on my palms.

BELCH: Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.

NOGUCHI: The stress feels real. Lou Tedrick says that's the point. Tedrick heads Verizon's learning and development. She says employees who survived robberies say the video is true to life.

LOU TEDRICK: The emotions that they felt during the robbery experience, they feel during the VR experience.

NOGUCHI: That realism, she says, makes the employee better prepared and more likely to remember how to react and not escalate an already dangerous situation.

TEDRICK: By the end of the experience, they feel like they've been robbed three times. And by the third time, their confidence is significantly higher.

NOGUCHI: This is the power and potential of virtual reality. While consumers haven't embraced it, employers from Walmart to airlines, food processors and professional sports teams are using it. It's now used to teach cashiers to treat customers with greater empathy. Warehouse workers learn how to stack pallets safely. Derek Belch of STRIVR says the basic premise is that people learn best through experience.

BELCH: As you saw, like, your heart rate went up. Right? You were like - oh, my God - what do I do? It's all about emotional preparedness.

NOGUCHI: Belch says this could be applied in many different workplace situations, including harassment or unconscious bias training. The benefit of the technology isn't just practice using a realistic substitute; it's also a far cheaper and easier way to train people across a big organization. This year, Walmart plans to train over a million of its workers on VR across 4,700 of its locations. The retailer's head of learning is a man appropriately named Andy Trainor.

ANDY TRAINOR: Must've been destiny.

NOGUCHI: For example, Walmart recently rolled out new machines used for consumers picking up online orders.

TRAINOR: Previously, we had to send three to four people to the store and to train how to set it up, how to maintain it, how to interact with customers with it.

NOGUCHI: That took days and thousands of man-hours.

TRAINOR: Now we just send a pair of VR goggles. We have VR modules that teach them how to do all of that stuff without any human intervention.

NOGUCHI: It isn't just physical skills like mechanics and reaction time. Walmart and others are increasingly using VR to train employees in soft skills, things like handling customer disputes or creating a more inclusive workplace.

TRAINOR: With all the data you get from VR, you can see where they look; you can see how they move and how they react. You could do an interview in VR and, based on the way they answer the questions, you can preselect whether or not they'd be a good fit for that role or not.

NOGUCHI: But that is something Walmart is still testing. Using VR to match candidates with specific jobs is still the new frontier. Current software isn't all that good at responding to subtle things, like how an employee rolls his eyes or raises his voice. So it's possible virtual reality could someday be programmed to understand the complexities of human interaction and help us make better decisions. But right now there isn't enough research to say where those limits lie.

Yuki Noguchi, NPR News, Menlo Park, Calif.

(SOUNDBITE OF HANDBOOK'S "UNKNOWN DESIRE")

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