Schultz Bemoans Starbucks' Lost 'Soul' Starbucks plans to open an additional 40,000 stores worldwide. But in a recent e-mail to staff, CEO Howard Schultz complained the coffee shops have "lost their soul." He urged employees to help bring the company back to its founding principles.
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Schultz Bemoans Starbucks' Lost 'Soul'

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Schultz Bemoans Starbucks' Lost 'Soul'

Schultz Bemoans Starbucks' Lost 'Soul'

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Now overseas expansion is causing trouble for another American corporation - Starbucks. We'll turn to the company's trouble in China in just a moment. First we go to Starbucks' hometown, Seattle. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports that the company's expansion is causing concern at the top.

WENDY KAUFMAN: But while Schultz was complaining that the rapid expansion had come with a cost, the company is actually accelerating the rate at which it's adding new stores. And says Bob Goldin, executive vice president of Technomic, a major food industry research and consulting firm:

BOB GOLDIN: If you go back about three, four years, they upped their unit forecast several times. I think at one point they were talking about having 25,000. Now they're talking about 40, which is, you know, kind of a staggering number.

KAUFMAN: Wendy Kaufman, NPR News, Seattle.

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