Letters: Transplants, State Department, Oscar Music Listeners wrote in to Weekend Edition Sunday about organ transplants, changes in the State Department, and Andy Trudeau's analysis of movie scores for the Oscars. Host Liane Hansen reads some of these letters.
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Letters: Transplants, State Department, Oscar Music

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Letters: Transplants, State Department, Oscar Music

Letters: Transplants, State Department, Oscar Music

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

Time now for your letters. After listening to our story about organ transplants last Sunday, Virginia Pulver(ph) of Santa Fe, New Mexico wrote, my spouse and I became members of the organ donor family back in February 2002 when our only son died in a motorcycle accident. Your wonderful story aired on the anniversary of our son's death. We are so grateful that our delightful son Caleb's(ph) spirit lives on in the lives of organ, cornea and tissue recipients around the USA. I have had the opportunity to meet several of the recipients and feel blessed to have them as part of my life now. Thank you for airing this story. I hope others will consider organ donation and become part of the organ donor family too.

Our story about a personnel shortage at the State Department prompted Patricia Jacobs(ph) of Bastrop, Texas to write, I listened this morning with both amusement and cynicism. Twenty-five years ago, while I was in university, the government was making a similar push to cultivate and recruit cultural and linguistic specialists at the time we were in another international crisis -the hostage taking in Iran. Of course, once in a crisis it's too late to look for experts. But once the crisis is over, it's back to business as usual. My education was paid for by a grant from the Department of Education. When I graduated the only people interested in hiring me, both in the public and private sector, was the CIA. I was fluent in both Arabic and Hebrew and went on to live and work in the Middle East. But I never actually used or was paid for the skills that the government had invested in. I was hired to set up distribution networks for technology products. No one needed my cultural or linguistic skills. I wonder how many more generations of graduates we have to go through before we learn how important knowing other cultures and languages really is. By the way, I now live in Texas and have a thriving business selling grass-fed beef.

Our segment on Oscar music delighted Dana Hagan(ph) of Torrance, California.

Mr. DANA HAGAN (Caller): I was so glad to hear Andy Trudeau's analysis of this year's film scores this morning. I was afraid I had missed this feature or that you had cancelled it. I'm sorry the segment has been shortened from previous years. Regardless, I love this feature. It's a perfect story for the medium of radio and it has made me a more appreciative listener at the movies.

HANSEN: If you want to write to us about what you hear on our show, just go to our Web page, npr.org, and click on the contact us link.

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