QB Great Favre Bids Packers Adieu The week in sports included the retirement of football legend Brett Favre, who set numerous NFL records as the quarterback of the Green Bay Packers.
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QB Great Favre Bids Packers Adieu

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QB Great Favre Bids Packers Adieu

QB Great Favre Bids Packers Adieu

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BRETT FAVRE: I've given everything I possibly can give to this organization, to the game of football, and I don't think I've got anything less - left to give and that's it. I know I can play, but I don't think I want to.

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

Brett Favre breaking a lot of hearts in Green Bay, even elsewhere. The Packers quarterback announced his retirement this week at Lambeau Field. You don't have to be a cheesehead to be sad. Our own Howard Bryant joins us. Good morning Howard.

HOWARD BRYANT: Scott, good morning.

SIMON: I'm a Bear fan all my life and I love Brett Favre.

BRYANT: Well, it's a sad day if you're a big football fan, and I think it's interesting because we talk about this with athletes all the time. You see guys who just won't go away, and Roger Clemens will not go away unless of course he ends up in a different type of pinstripe.

SIMON: Well, but - right. He might be pitching for Leavenworth next year, but...

BRYANT: Next year, right, and then Michael Jordan wouldn't go, and Ali and all - and Sugar Ray Leonard. It happens all the time, but the interesting thing about sports is that you don't have a seniors league in football. When the tank is empty, you have to really respond to that, and I think the interesting thing about him is that most players, when they go, they either get knocked out of the game physically, you know, Joe Montana, Terry Bradshaw they get knocked out because their bodies couldn't hold up to the game anymore.

SIMON: Yeah.

BRYANT: What Favre said was more interesting. He said that he was emotionally tired. And I thought that was the most revelatory thing of the - of his retirement because clearly, he could still play. He had one of his best seasons last year, but I think that football is a game that requires so much from you physically that if you can't take the mental pounding of it, then you really don't belong there anymore and I think he - I don't think you're going to see him again.

SIMON: Did - of all the records he's set, is that 275 consecutive starts about the most imposing?

BRYANT: Well, absolutely, especially when you look at his game. When you think about Brett Favre and you go back to the original Brett Favre, back in '92 to '95, '96, he was out of the pocket. He was running around, he was scrambling, he was leaving himself vulnerable to all kinds of big hits from guys, and yet he was there every day, and I think the thing that I'm going to remember most about watching him play was the fact that in this day and age when so many players don't speak for their team, he was the signature guy.

SIMON: Yeah.

BRYANT: He was there for 16 years and I think that's something that requires a lot of passion, both for the team and the city because he surely could have left if he wanted to.

SIMON: Howard, 30 seconds left, Marion Jones, the Olympic track star entered prison yesterday. Does this end doping scandals in track and field?

BRYANT: No, not at all. In fact, it's probably just the beginning. I don't think it ends doping scandals at all. What I hope it ends is the line to federal prosecutors. That seems to be the big story with her is that you just can't do this and if you - if we go look at the cards here, you've got Marion Jones and you may have Bond and Clemens to follow. These guys need to realize that their status does not give them any type of special dispensation when it comes to the feds.

SIMON: Howard Bryant, senior writer for ESPN.com and ESPN magazine. Thanks so much.

BRYANT: Thank you.

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