Davidson Continues to Surprise in NCAA Tournament In college basketball's postseason, the Sweet 16 have become the Elite Eight. By Sunday, there will be a Final Four. The alliteration never seems to end with college basketball, nor do the surprises. The big one of this year's NCAA tournament is 10th-seeded Davidson.
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Davidson Continues to Surprise in NCAA Tournament

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Davidson Continues to Surprise in NCAA Tournament

Davidson Continues to Surprise in NCAA Tournament

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SUSAN STAMBERG, host:

Time now for sports.

(Soundbite of music)

STAMBERG: The Sweet 16 have become the Elite Eight. By tomorrow, there'll be a Final Four. The alliteration never ends with college basketball, nor do surprises. The big one of this year's NCAA tournament is 10th-seeded Davidson.

Our own slam-dunker Howard Bryant joins us. Good morning.

HOWARD BRYANT: Hey, Susan. Good morning. I have not dunked a basketball since high school.

STAMBERG: I won't tell. But listen, everything seems to be in its proper place except for Davidson, seeded 10th, but oh that Curry kid.

BRYANT: Wonderful, absolutely just a great story, and I think what I like best about him was that you go in, and he's a one-man show in the first round, and you say okay, nice game, but now you're going to play Georgetown, and you're going to get beat in that one, and that's pretty much when the Cinderella shoe comes off.

And then he has a terrible game against Georgetown for about the first 35 minutes and then decides to take over that game and beat the number-two seed and then of course scores in the last game.

And so now you're saying to yourself we've seen this before, and I really, really like what the North Carolina coach, Roy Williams, said about him because he's the son of an NBA player, a great shooter, Dell Curry, and he just said well, we all missed him. Everyone in the whole conference, we just missed him. And that's a wonderful thing when you think about kids out there playing and needing a chance to play and showing themselves.

STAMBERG: And all of this thanks to this Stephen Curry, and that means that Kansas-Davidson has to be the game to watch tomorrow, right?

BRYANT: It is because it reminds me a lot - obviously, he's not in the same class as Larry Bird, but it does take you back to those teams, the Indiana State team of '79, where they were essentially a one-man team where this one player is carrying them.

Even George Mason, when they made their great Final Four run a couple of years ago, that was a pretty balanced team, and everybody was having a great go of it, but this kid is doing things. He's taken the whole team on his back, and he's become a national story.

STAMBERG: Who is going, then, to the Final Four, do you think?

BRYANT: As much as I like to make fun of my own bracket because I'm last in my own pool, one thing has remained constant, and that is North Carolina is still alive and so is Memphis and so is UCLA, and of course those are three that I picked.

It would be interesting to have all four number-one seeds go to the Final Four. I still think it's going to be North Carolina over Louisville. I'm not going to go against Davidson now. They've got that George Mason magic going. I think Memphis is going to beat Texas, and Xavier, the team that I said was overrated from the start, I still think they will lose to UCLA.

STAMBERG: WEEKEND EDITION Howard Bryant, senior writer for ESPN.com, ESPN the magazine, ESPN the toothpaste, thank you so much.

BRYANT: Thank you.

STAMBERG: This is NPR News.

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