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RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Basra is better, but attacks continue today in Baghdad. Iraqi military officials say they have control of most of the southern city of Basra today, after Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr told his forces to stand down. The week-long government crackdown on Shiite militias sparked mass violence in Basra, and in Shiite areas in Baghdad, and other regions. Hundreds of people have been killed.

Yesterday, Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr ordered his Mahdi army to stop fighting, but he also made demands of the government, including amnesty for his followers. Shops in Basra are re-opening today. Schools are expected to open tomorrow. Meanwhile, a three-day curfew in Baghdad was lifted yesterday, although there were mortar and rocket attacks on the Green Zone again today.

Zimbabwe's main opposition party is claiming that it's won a landslide victory, but election officials say it is too early to name a winner in the parliamentary elections. The government of Robert Mugabe said any early victory claim would be an attempted coup. Results of the election began trickling out this morning, but no official details were available on the presidential vote in which Mugabe faces his most formidable political challenge in nearly three decades of power.

The latest results show the opposition movement and Mugabe's party running neck and neck. Zimbabwe is suffering the world's highest inflation of more than 100,000 percent, chronic shortages of food and fuel, and an HIV/AIDS epidemic.

To this country now, where U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Henry Paulson is expected to unveil a set of proposals to revamp the nation's system of financial regulation this morning. Steve Beckner of Market News International reports.

STEVE BECKNER: Since the mortgage crisis erupted, disjointed financial supervision has come under fire, and Paulson has been steering the president's working group on financial markets, which includes Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, toward a new regulatory approach. Under the sweeping overhaul, which the former Goldman Sachs executive will propose, the commodity future's trading commission and the office of thrift supervision would be folded into other agencies.

The Fed, which now supervises many commercial banks, but not investment banks like Bear Stearns, would get more authority and be named overall market stability regulator. But a swift reorganization seems unlikely. Democratic congressional leaders have already proposed their own changes, and bureaucratic turf wars are legendary in Washington.

MARTIN: Steve Beckner reporting there. And after 61 years in business, Aloha Airlines is shutting down its passenger flight operations beginning today. A company press release said United and other airlines will help accommodate passengers who have flights scheduled on Aloha. Kayla Rosenfeld reports from Hawaii Public Radio.

KAYLA ROSENFELD: Aloha Airlines will fly its full inter-island schedule on Monday, but will shut down at the end of the day. Transpacific flights to the mainland are cancelled. In a company press release, Aloha's President and CEO David Banmiller said unfair competition succeeded in driving the 61-year-old company out of business.

Aloha's troubles escalated in 2006 when Phoenix-based Mesa Air Group launched the new inter-island carrier, Go! Aloha filed for bankruptcy two weeks ago, saying it couldn't compete and pay escalating fuel costs. The shutdown of Aloha's passenger operations will affect about 1,900 employees. Aloha will continue operating its air cargo and aviation service units until it finds a buyer.

MARTIN: Kayla Rosenfeld of Hawaii Public Radio reporting. That's the news, and it's always online at npr.org.

BILL WOLFF: This is NPR.

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