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ALISON STEWART, host:

And now, Rachel, let's get some more news headlines.

BILL WOLFF: This is NPR.

RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Thanks, Alison. Zimbabwe's high court is expected to rule today on whether last month's presidential election results can be released. They've been delayed for weeks now. Here's NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton.

OFEIBEA QUIST-ARCTON: After a weekend emergency summit of southern African leaders, Zimbabweans are waiting to find out what goes next. The opposition went to the meeting in Zambia with high hopes that regional leaders would encourage the absent President Robert Mugabe to step down, but their final declaration fell far short of that hope.

Instead, the region urged the opposition to respect the election results when they're announced, and go into a second round run-off against Mugabe. Meanwhile, Zimbabwe's Electoral Commission has ordered a partial recount of votes in some constituencies, a move opposed by the opposition. The Movement for Democratic Change has vowed to go to court to contest that decision, accusing the authorities of using delaying tactics to tamper with the vote.

MARTIN: NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reporting. Thirteen hundred Iraqi soldiers and police are now out of a job. The Iraqi government fired them over the weekend for deserting, or refusing to fight last month in Basra. The Iraqi government launched a major campaign against Shiite militias there. Many government fighters dropped their weapons and just left. At the time, the government took harsh criticism of its battle plans.

Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling is going to court today. Rowling will testify in a New York courtroom in hopes of blocking the publication of an encyclopedia about the famed Harry Potter series. She sued the creator of a popular website after he announced plans to turn it into a book. The site is an index of spells, potions, characters, and history from the fantasy series. Rowling has linked to the site in the past, but says using the content to sell books violates her copyright.

An '80s retread topped the box office this weekend. Slasher-film remake "Prom Night" raked in 22.7 million dollars in its debut. "Street Kings," a cop drama with Forest Whitaker and Keanu Reeves, opened in second place with 12 million dollars. "21" fell to third place, taking in 11 million. That's the news. It's always online at npr.org.

WOLFF: This is NPR.

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