Yamaha Upgrades Player Piano with Web Connection The Japanese piano company Yamaha has been selling its disklavier player piano for decades. But, in keeping with the times, the latest model of the disklavier has an Internet connection.
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Yamaha Upgrades Player Piano with Web Connection

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Yamaha Upgrades Player Piano with Web Connection

Yamaha Upgrades Player Piano with Web Connection

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And while we're talking about downloading music, our last word in business today comes from Yamaha. And the word is Disklavier. That's the name of the player piano the Japanese company's been selling for decades. In keeping with the times, the latest model of the Disklavier has an Internet connection. The New York Times calls this the first piano in the world with a Web connection. Why wouldn't anybody else have thought of this?

The device still looks like a concert piano. It's big, black and shiny, still has hammers and strings. But the Web connection allows you to subscribe to live piano radio stations, and you can also download songs from the Yamaha store -just like iTunes - download them and the piano will play them for you all day, any musical style.

You could play it yourself, of course, but you're not going to have time because you'll be busy paying off the $45,000 price of the player piano.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LYNN NEARY, host:

And I'm Lynn Neary.

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