Letters: Iraq Deaths, Colombia Trip, Daylight Saving We hear from our listeners about deaths in Iraq, President Bush's visit to Colombia and Arizona's non-observance of daylight-saving time.
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Letters: Iraq Deaths, Colombia Trip, Daylight Saving

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Letters: Iraq Deaths, Colombia Trip, Daylight Saving

Letters: Iraq Deaths, Colombia Trip, Daylight Saving

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

Time now for your letters. Richard Hubbard(ph) wrote to say he was moved by the piece about Navy Corpsman Emch, who was killed one day before he was scheduled to leave Iraq. Those men and women who become corpsmen are among the most selfless individuals in the military.

Regarding our coverage of the president's trip to Columbia last week, Matt Roman(ph) of Johnson City, New York writes to say, I hardly think that the poor and working-class people of Latin America need Hugo Chavez to educate them about how they have been affected by the policies of the United States or to motivate them to protest the Bush visit. To imply that Chavez is somehow responsible for the massive protests is an insult to the protestors.

And Ted Robbins's essay on Daylight Saving Time in Arizona prompted a slew of letters, including this one from Jeff Ingram(ph) of Tucson. As our late great Congressman Morris Udall would have said, your commentator on Daylight Saving Time stepped deep into the gumwah(ph).

Here in Tucson, daylight saving would mean moving an hour of light from the coolest hours, good for gardeners and other outdoor people, to the hottest evening hours. That's bad for we who love being outside and bad for energy conservation.

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