New Stationary Cycling Record: 7 Days Straight George Hood, 50, broke the Guinness World Record for continuous exercise — for a second time. Hood rode a stationary bike for more than seven days, sleeping no longer than 12 minutes at a time. If he had been on the open road, he would have traveled more than 2,000 miles.
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New Stationary Cycling Record: 7 Days Straight

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New Stationary Cycling Record: 7 Days Straight

New Stationary Cycling Record: 7 Days Straight

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

If exercising three days a week seems daunting - and it certainly does to me -just think of George Hood. He broke the Guinness World Record for continuous exercise for a second time, and he's 50 years old. Hood rode a stationary bike for more than seven days and slept no longer than 12 minutes at a time. Had he been on the open road, he would have traveled more than 2,000 miles. Instead, he burned 46,000 calories, all at his local YMCA.

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