Three Books About Cowboys and Indians As a child, Emily Wylie always wanted to be a cowboy — or maybe an Indian. Though she no longer constructs teepees out of table cloths, she turns to these three books when she wants to relive her romance with the American West.
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Three Books About Cowboys and Indians

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Three Books About Cowboys and Indians

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Three Books About Cowboys and Indians

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ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

Well, now to our serious Three Books. We're inviting writers to recommend three great reads on one theme. Today, teacher and writer Emily Wylie explains her passion for books about the American West.

EMILY WYLIE: The reality of the American West was horribly, tragically antagonistic, of course. But in these books, my favorite characters look a lot alike; they speak little, love open space and freedom, are intensely moral, and loyal to the end. That and bacon grease? That's the milieu for me.

SIEGEL: At our Web site, you can find more recommendations from the series Three Books, such as three books about the beach or books about blood and brains. Those are at npr.org/summerbooks.

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