Hear Them Roar: Noisy New World Monkeys Biologist Greg Budney journeys to Guatemala, where the bellowing calls of howler monkeys fill the jungle.
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Hear Them Roar: Noisy New World Monkeys

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Hear Them Roar: Noisy New World Monkeys

Hear Them Roar: Noisy New World Monkeys

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

There's also a lot of noise out there in the wilderness, and we're tuning in with our series Sounds Wild. We've gone to the rainforest of Guatemala, and today we return for a wake-up call from a group of howler monkeys. They were recorded by biologist Greg Budney from the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology in a region called the Peten.

(Soundbite of howler monkey)

Mr. GREG BUDNEY (Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology): I love this sound.

(Soundbite of howler monkey)

Mr. BUDNEY: It's one of the great sounds of tropical forest, the voice of howler monkeys.

(Soundbite of howler monkey)

Mr. BUDNEY: I had set out this particular morning well before dawn and I was thinking, gosh, it would be great to get close to these guys, figure out where they spend the night, when this male fired off right next to me.

(Soundbite of howler monkey)

Mr. BUDNEY: I just dropped right in that location, turned my mike smoothly and quietly in his direction and got the recorder on and then sat there for 10 or 15 minutes while this morning chorus, this interaction between different howlers played out.

(Soundbite of howler monkey)

Mr. BUDNEY: And the males in particular has a large throat sac, which they expand when they vocalize. So they're a pretty formidable looking primate.

(Soundbite of howler monkey)

Mr. BUDNEY: The howling is their way of establishing their territorial prerogative over this area of forest.

(Soundbite of howler monkey)

Mr. BUDNEY: Just before the sun rises, they wake up from their nests in the trees that they've built the night before and begin calling. We made it through another night; don't think about coming over here.

(Soundbite of howler monkey)

MONTAGNE: That's biologist Greg Budney. The sounds of our series come from the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology. NPR's Christopher Joyce tracks them down for us. And you can hear a whole jungle of animal sounds at our Web site, NPR.org, where we have field recordings of the Laughing Kookaburra and other animals.

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