Gustav Hits La. Coast The center of Hurricane Gustav crashed ashore near Cocodrie, La., some 70 miles southwest of New Orleans, Monday morning. New Orleans was spared a direct hit from the 110-mile-an-hour winds.
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Gustav Hits La. Coast

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Gustav Hits La. Coast

Gustav Hits La. Coast

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F: President Bush was in Austin, Texas today, monitoring the storm. He said the coordination has been a lot better than during Katrina.

P: All in all, what I look for is to determine whether or not assets are in place to help, whether or not there's coordination, and whether or not there's preparation for recovery, and to that end I feel - I feel good about this event.

: First this hour to New Orleans. That's where we find NPR's Greg Allen. And Greg, where did you go today around the city? What'd you see?

GREG ALLEN: In fact, some people were disappointed the storm wasn't worse than it was. I think that's kind of an unusual response. I think most people were very happy that we didn't see the winds or the storm surge that was expected and that we saw in Hurricane Katrina.

: And Greg, you were there right after Katrina three years ago. You know exactly what was going on this time then.

ALLEN: So the damage done to the city is much less, and I think it's going to come through it in much better shape.

: Greg, there has been a lot of concern about the state of the levees, the integrity of the levees. What can you tell us about that?

ALLEN: That may be the case, but however, it has led to a substantial amount of water in the Upper Ninth Ward. It's fairly deep in some places. We don't know the true extent of that yet. We'll know more of that in the hours - and over the next day.

: Greg, Mayor Ray Nagin had estimated about 95 percent, I think, of the city's residents had evacuated before the storm. Are you getting any sense of when they might be able to come back?

ALLEN: There is some reserves in the refineries, but they had to shut down because of the hurricane. So he wants to get fuel back into southern Louisiana so people can have it in their cars when they return.

: Okay, NPR's Greg Allen in New Orleans. Greg, thanks so much.

ALLEN: You're welcome.

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