Boston Memorial Marks Ill-Fated Planes' Departure A Sept. 11 memorial was dedicated Tuesday at Logan International Airport in Boston. That is where two planes took off before hijackers on board brought down New York's twin towers at the World Trade Center.
NPR logo

Boston Memorial Marks Ill-Fated Planes' Departure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/94499909/94499869" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Boston Memorial Marks Ill-Fated Planes' Departure

Boston Memorial Marks Ill-Fated Planes' Departure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/94499909/94499869" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

If you happen to be in Boston on this September 11th, you could find a memorial at Boston's Logan Airport. It marks the place where the two hijacked planes took off before they brought down New York's twin towers in 2001. NPR's Tovia Smith paid a visit.

TOVIA SMITH: Seven years after 9/11, Caroline Ogonowski says she can finally think about her dad, American Airlines pilot John Ogonowski, in terms of happy memories and not just his tragic death. She says it's fitting that the new Logan Memorial is set on nearly three acres of rolling green hills with scores of newly planted trees.

CAROLINE OGONOWSKI: It's just not an inanimate object sitting there, but you can go see how it changes and comes back and is alive again every spring. And it's about growth and life.

SMITH: At the center of the green space is a two-story glass cube. On top, hanging glass shards are meant to evoke a sense of a fractured sky. Inside, the names of all the passengers and crew are etched into huge glass plates. Architect Keith Moskow says the long winding path to the memorial represents the path toward healing.

KEITH MOSKOW: When you enter within, with the screening of the glass, it becomes an inward and upward looking place. So you put aside the outside so it becomes more of a chapel, in a sense.

PATRICIA ITCHERY: I remember the Captain Ogonowski, I remember that name.

SMITH: Airport Security Officer Patricia Itchery came to pay tribute to the victims by herself, but ended up recalling the horror of the day with another TSA employee, Chris Wilson.

ITCHERY: That was where it took place.

CHRIS WILSON: At Gate 19, yes. It sends shivers down your spine.

JOHN KRAJOVIC: What happens when people come to this space, they start talking about 9/11. It's therapeutic, and that's part of what he hoped would happen.

SMITH: John Krajovic is a manager with Massport, the agency that runs Logan Airport and paid for the three-and-a-half million dollar memorial. Massport Executive Director Tom Kinton says it's meant not only for victim's families, but also for airport workers who were deeply scarred by the attack.

TOM KINTON: People were doing their jobs, and we got beat. We got beat as a society at many different levels. And so it was the airport community that said we have to do a memorial.

SMITH: But there are some relatives of 9/11 victims who see the airport memorial as misplaced.

CARIE LEMACK: For us, it's not a place with comfort or solace.

SMITH: Carie Lemack lost her mother Judy Larocque on Flight 11.

LEMACK: When I think of my mom, I want to think about how she lived her life to its fullest, and I don't want to have to think about how her life was taken from her.

SMITH: Tovia Smith, NPR News, Boston.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.