Hawaiian Entertainer Don Ho Dies at 76 Famed Hawaiian crooner Don Ho died Saturday of heart problems. Best known for his theme song, "Tiny Bubbles," Ho enertained many generations of fans on the islands and on tour. He was 76.
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Hawaiian Entertainer Don Ho Dies at 76

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Hawaiian Entertainer Don Ho Dies at 76

Hawaiian Entertainer Don Ho Dies at 76

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(Soundbite of "Tiny Bubbles")

Mr. DON HO (Singer): (Singing) Tiny bubbles in the wine, make me happy, make me feel fine.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Hawaiian singer Don Ho, one of the last of the '60s-era crooners, died yesterday of heart failure. He gave his last performance this past Thursday. Ho's parents owned a bar in Waikiki, and soon after he entered the entertainment scene, he became a fixture in his home state. Hawaii is my partner, he once said.

"Tiny Bubbles," his signature tune, was released in 1966 and brought him international fame. He started and ended each performance with the song. In 1998, NPR's Scott Simon spoke with Ho and asked him about that.

(Soundbite of interview)

Mr. HO: You have to make it different and nice for them. You can't bore them every night. You may be bored with singing "Tiny Bubbles" every night, but you've got to think about the people who want to hear that song every night.

SCOTT SIMON: True.

Mr. HO: And they come back every year to hear it again, and again, and again, again, and again.

HANSEN: Don Ho died yesterday in Honolulu. He was 76 years old.

Mr. HO: (Singing) With a feeling that I'm going to love you 'til the end of time.

HANSEN: You're listening to NPR News.

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