FSU Football Star Wins Rhodes Scholarship Myron Rolle, the starting strong safety for the Florida State Seminoles, has been awarded the Rhodes scholarship to study at Oxford University. The pre-med student had to miss part of Saturday's game against Maryland because he was being interviewed for the scholarship.
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FSU Football Star Wins Rhodes Scholarship

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FSU Football Star Wins Rhodes Scholarship

FSU Football Star Wins Rhodes Scholarship

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MELISSA BLOCK, host:

An update now on a college football player we talked to earlier this month on the program. Myron Rolle is the starting strong safety for the Florida State Seminoles. While he's one of the best players in one of the top football programs in the country, this past Saturday fans cheered for him for another reason. His team had an important game the same day as his final interview for the Rhodes scholarship. A tough choice? Not for Rolle. On this program two weeks ago, he explained.

Mr. MYRON ROLLE (College Student; Football Player, Florida State Seminoles): Football will always be there for me, I believe. And my coaches understand that academics and education are the priority for me. So they are very supportive of my decision, as well.

BLOCK: Well, on Saturday, after his final scholarship interview in Birmingham, Alabama, Myron Rolle learned he was indeed selected as a Rhodes scholar. Then he hopped a charter jet to his team's game in College Park, Maryland. Rolle missed the start of the game, but he played in the second half of the 37-3 victory. The aspiring neurosurgeon isn't sure if he would skip the lucrative NFL for two years at Oxford University in England. Stay tuned.

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