Hurricane Ike's Scars Remain Two months ago, Galveston resident Merri Edwards was weathering the storm at a Fairfield Inn outside Houston, Texas, after evacuating her home. She moved from Houston to Austin, then back again to Galveston to assess the damage in the place she has called home for 20 years.
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Hurricane Ike's Scars Remain

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Hurricane Ike's Scars Remain

Hurricane Ike's Scars Remain

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

Two months ago, we spoke with Hurricane Ike evacuee and Galveston, Texas, resident Merri Edwards. We followed her story on our blog as she moved around the region looking for dry land. We checked in with her this past week.

Ms. MERRI EDWARDS: We're living on the east end of the city in a house that we rented. Our house has been gutted, and it's being rebuilt. And we'll be moving back into it after the first of the year.

HANSEN: Really?

Ms. EDWARDS: Yeah.

HANSEN: When we spoke in September, you said you might leave Galveston for good. Is that still your plan?

Ms. EDWARDS: No. I knew that the longer that we stayed, the harder it would be to leave. And it was really - we were having a terrible time trying to decide where to move. And we, you know, we looked at some - looked at houses in other towns and talked a lot about it. And finally, the decision was kind of made for us because my son and daughter-in-law told us last week they're going to have a baby. And it'll be their first child, and I want to be here for it. So we're going to stay for a while.

HANSEN: Congratulations.

Ms. EDWARDS: Thank you.

HANSEN: You can also hear an extended version of our chat with Merri on our blog at npr.org/soapbox.

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