Your Letters: Mexico, YouTube And Scott's Mom We received a lot of mail about our story by John Burnett on Juarez, Mexico, where battling drug cartels have turned the town into one of the most dangerous places in the hemisphere. We also heard from you about our YouTube channel launch and Scott Simon's mother.
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Your Letters: Mexico, YouTube And Scott's Mom

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Your Letters: Mexico, YouTube And Scott's Mom

Your Letters: Mexico, YouTube And Scott's Mom

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SCOTT SIMON, host:

Time now for your letters.

(Soundbite of typewriter)

(Soundbite of music)

SIMON: We received a lot of mail about our story by John Burnett on Juarez, Mexico, where battling drug cartels have turned the town into one of the most dangerous in the hemisphere, where even Mexican journalists are now being targeted. At the end of the story, we asked for your thoughts on how to curb the drug violence. Robert Hevner(ph) of North Bend, Washington, suggested this in our blog. Legalize it, decriminalize it, regulate it, educate. The war on drugs has indirectly killed thousands of Mexicans and South Americans, has made criminals of hundreds of thousands of harmless nonviolent American citizens, and has laid waste to cities like Juarez and Tijuana.

Nice note on the launch of our YouTube channel from Joe Carl(ph) of Blue Springs, Missouri, who wrote, I've appreciated NPR for years. The additional connection with YouTube only adds to my respect for your services. He went on to praise a posted video blog with actor Terrence Howard. I'm a Presbyterian minister. I would like to use this as an intro to a sermon. The visible humanity in this interview on the topic of our hiddenness to others is profound and to be celebrated in its honesty. Our YouTube channel, by the way, is at www.youtube.com/weekendedition.

A more personal note now. My conversation with my mother, Pat Lyons Simon Newman Gilband, recorded as part of StoryCorps' National Day of Listening, drew many responses. This one's from Sally Showles(ph) of Rosemont, Pennsylvania.

Ms. SALLY SHOWLES (Caller): I loved listening to Scott Simon and his mother. Their conversation was inspiring and brought tears to my eyes. Their discussion gives me courage to reflect on the many gifts my mother has given me. I'll call her today to tell her.

SIMON: And Dodie Riggs(ph) of Guilford, Vermont, said our discussion about good manners reminded her of her own mother's social graces.

Ms. DODIE RIGGS (Caller): We were at the grocery store and kept bumping into the same man aisle by aisle. They nodded and smiled as folks in Minnesota do at the market. And finally mom said, don't we know each other? The man seemed a bit embarrassed as he replied, I'm the man who comes around. He was their trash collector. Mom didn't miss a beat as she told him, oh, of course, you're one of the most important men in my life. That man just beamed. And I've never forgotten their exchange. This guided my manners and brought me many special encounters over the last 50 years.

SIMON: Thanks to everyone who wrote in. My mother is quite pleased. To send us your comments, go to our Web site, npr.org, click on "Contact Us," or you can post a response on our blog, npr.org/soapbox.

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