House Judiciary Panel Gives Goodling Immunity The House Judiciary Committee has voted for immunity from prosecution for Monica Goodling, who was the Justice Department's White House liaison and senior counselor to Attorney General Alberto Gonzales. Committee leaders want to know about the White House's role in the firing of eight U.S. attorneys.
NPR logo

House Judiciary Panel Gives Goodling Immunity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9833666/9833667" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
House Judiciary Panel Gives Goodling Immunity

Law

House Judiciary Panel Gives Goodling Immunity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9833666/9833667" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

NPR's Ari Shapiro reports.

ARI SHAPIRO: Unidentified Woman: Mr. Chairman, 32 members voted aye, six members voted no.

SHAPIRO: Goodling was the Justice Department's White House liaison and senior counselor to the attorney general. So as committee chairman John Conyers put it, she is a key witness in Congress' investigation of the U.S. attorney dismissals.

JOHN CONYERS: She was apparently involved in crucial discussions over a two-year period with senior White House aides and with other senior justice officials in which the termination list was developed, refined and finalized.

SHAPIRO: She resigned as the U.S. attorney scandal exploded. Her lawyer said she'd take the Fifth rather than answer questions about the firings. Now, chairman Conyers can force her to testify. A few Republicans pushed back. One said immunity could be a get out of jail card for someone who's committed a crime. Another, Congressman Louie Gohmert of Texas, asked about the growing pressure on the attorney general.

LOUIE GOHMERT: If he were to resign, is this committee intent on going forward with the subpoena?

BLOCK: How do I know, sir? Let's not go that way today.

SHAPIRO: The resignation question is becoming harder to ignore all the time.

MARK PRYOR: I told him that I still think it's in the best interest of the department and the administration that he resign.

SHAPIRO: That's Democratic Senator Mark Pryor of Arkansas. He has accused the attorney general of lying outright. Gonzales requested a meeting with Pryor today. After their talk, the attorney general left without answering any questions. Pryor told reporters that Gonzales did not apologize and did not give an adequate explanation for the contradictory stories that have come out of the Justice Department.

PRYOR: He said that his intention was to not step down. The president has expressed confidence in him, and he plans to stay and work on mending some fences.

SHAPIRO: Ari Shapiro, NPR News, Washington.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.