Colorado University Publicizes Banned Students In response to the Virginia Tech tragedy, the University of Northern Colorado has posted the names and photos of students who have been banned from campus.
NPR logo

Colorado University Publicizes Banned Students

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9847309/9847310" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Colorado University Publicizes Banned Students

Colorado University Publicizes Banned Students

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9847309/9847310" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

ALEX COHEN, host:

Back now with DAY TO DAY. Colleges across the country are reevaluating campus security after last week's tragedy at Virginia Tech. The University of Northern Colorado in the town of Greeley has taken an unusual step. On its Web site, the university has posted the names and the photographs of people who've been banned from the campus. The university says these people may or may not be a threat to student safety, but they all have violated the school's code of conduct.

Earlier I spoke with Erik Myers. He's the news editor for the campus newspaper, The Mirror. I asked Erik Myers what sort of people have wound up on this list.

Mr. ERIK MYERS (News Editor, The Mirror): Not all of them are necessarily dangerous. Of course there's people like Mitchell Cozad, who has been accused of stabbing another player on his football team, but then you have cases like Brittany Bethel. She had an eating disorder, and from what she told me, she passed out at a rec center and therefore she was - so the administrators told her, endangering her own health, endangering her own welfare, and therefore breaking the code of conduct here at UNC.

COHEN: What are students supposed to do if they see one of these faces on the campus.

Mr. MYERS: The Web site's telling them to call the UNC police, you know, contact any kind of administrator or official so they can handle the situation.

COHEN: There was a link to this page where the photos are listed that referenced the shootings at Virginia Tech. It seems like kind of a volatile connection.

Mr. MYERS: Oh, absolutely. I spoke with Nate Hoss(ph), the university's relations person. He told me that it was, in fact, something of a response to what happened at Virginia Tech last week. People are just freaking out about it, and you know, just another tool to raise awareness, give the campus community an opportunity to recognize people who are not welcomed on campus.

COHEN: Did the university see why maybe students would be upset being linked to, you know, a shooter?

Mr. MYERS: Absolutely, but from a letter Kay Norton, the university president, sent out, they're quite mum as far as talking about what these individuals have done, which seems to be the question everyone wants answered.

COHEN: What about UNC students who aren't on the list, people on campus? What are they saying about the Web site?

Mr. MYERS: Oh, it's very interesting reactions. Most students that I've talked with, they like it because they know, you know, who is not welcomed on campus, violent individuals particularly, but there is some concern these are just going to perpetuate stereotypes, and there are some concerns that there are individuals who've been banned, like Brittany Bethel, who might have been banned from campus for less extreme violations of the code of conduct.

COHEN: Erik Myers, news editor of The Mirror at the University of Northern Colorado, thank you so much.

Mr. MYERS: Thank you.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.