Consumer Spending Creeps Higher in March The Commerce Department says consumer spending edged up 0.3 percent in March, the weakest showing in five months. But even as gas prices soar and home values flatten, Americans have the cash to keep buying.
NPR logo

Consumer Spending Creeps Higher in March

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9910489/9910490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Consumer Spending Creeps Higher in March

Consumer Spending Creeps Higher in March

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/9910489/9910490" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

In NPR's business news, consumer spending gives the economy a lift, but not much.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: Gas prices may be soaring, home values may be stagnating, but Americans still have the cash to keep spending. That's according to the latest date from the Commerce Department out this morning. In March, unemployment hit a five-year low and salaries went up, but consumer spending only rose less than half a percent. A Reuters survey finds that consumer confidence - essentially how good you feel about the economy right now - fell in April to a seven-month low.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.