What Listeners Are Giving Up For Lent Day to Day asked listeners to tell us what they were giving up for Lent in a time when everyone already seems to be giving up so much. Here are some of the responses.
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What Listeners Are Giving Up For Lent

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What Listeners Are Giving Up For Lent

What Listeners Are Giving Up For Lent

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ALEX COHEN, host:

Back now with Day to Day. Today is the first day of Lent, the beginning of 40 days of fasting, prayer, and self-denial for many Christians around the world.

MADELEINE BRAND, host:

For some people it simply means giving up something like candy or cigarettes.

COHEN: Or candy cigarettes.

BRAND: Right, candy cigarettes. I don't know if I could give those up. So tasty. For others, Lent this year is an opportunity to simplify to save money, even in this down economy. Well we asked you, what you're giving up.

(Soundbite of music)

ERICA MORRISON: Hi, I'm Erica Morrison from Dearborn, Michigan. For Lent, instead of driving, I vow to walk anywhere I need to go that is within one mile of my home. These include the grocery store, church, Starbucks and lunch spots. I plan to limit large grocery trips and Target to one day a week, Sunday, when the fast is suspended for the day.

COHEN: Listener Elizabeth Sharon(ph), and we hope we got your last name right. She comes to us from Clemens, North Carolina and she wrote that she's considering giving up wasting time on the computer - this maybe my last email in a while, she wrote - and using that formerly wasted time to keep up with my household chores or volunteer more. Good for me, good for the family - these kinds of sacrifice is won't cost us money but will improve everyone's holiday of life without the financial cost.

BRAND: We also got response from people who are aiming for a little self-improvement.

AMANDA VELASQUEZ: My name is Amanda Velasquez(ph) from Pasadena, California. I've been planning to give up sugar this year for Lent. I figure it would be challenging and a good chance to remember Lent during each craving. My husband decided to act something this year, a daily walk each morning.

BRAND: Adrian Gilley(ph) of Tulsa, Oklahoma wrote, I'm giving up gossip and hoping this will lead to an overall improvement in controlling my tongue. Lent for me is often more spiritual than material. Well, at least that's the goal.

COHEN: And here's one from Michael Getts of Boston. I'm giving up alcohol for Lent. As someone who greatly enjoys a good glass of wine or strong martini, it certainly qualifies as a sacrifice but it allows for consistently clear head to ponder the big questions.

BRAND: And of course, we had a listener who is taking the opposite approach for Lent.

COHEN: Matt Drew(ph) writes, I've chosen to stop giving things ujp.

BRAND: Matt Drew, coincidentally or not from Las Vegas, Nevada, Sin City. We understand, give up nothing Matt. You deserve it.

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