Super Mario 64's Record-Breaking Sale Stuns Industry Experts A copy of Nintendo's Super Mario 64 sold for $1.56 million at auction, breaking the record for most expensive video game. "I was ... a bit blindsided," says Valarie McLeckie of the auction house.

Mamma Mia! Super Mario 64 Is The First Video Game To Sell For More Than $1 Million

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

For millions and millions of people, this is a familiar sound.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR: (As Mario) It's me, Mario.

(SOUNDBITE OF KOJI KONDO'S "TITLE THEME")

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

It's Super Mario 64. My brother played it. A copy from the '90s, just sold for more than $1.5 million, a new record for a video game. Valarie McLeckie worked on the sale with Heritage Auctions.

VALARIE MCLECKIE: Mario has become such a cornerstone character in our collective global culture. He's basically the Mickey Mouse of video games.

INSKEEP: Super Mario 64 came out in 1996 - that was a different century, by the way - and it was super popular.

PFEIFFER: Maybe you have one in storage somewhere. But don't quit your day job yet.

MCLECKIE: Essentially, the box and the seal have to be in perfect condition. It has to look as pristine as the day it came off the assembly line.

PFEIFFER: But an open game that's been played probably goes for closer to $20 to $50.

INSKEEP: Although go ahead. Take a look around the attic. Chris Kohler researches and writes about video game history.

CHRIS KOHLER: Do you have a million-dollar game in your attic? Probably not. But with prices going where they are, do you have a thousand-dollar game in your attic? Maybe you do.

PFEIFFER: And they said you were wasting your time playing all those video games.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR: (As Mario) Thank you so much for playing my game.

PFEIFFER: No, thank you, Mario.

(SOUNDBITE OF KOJI KONDO'S "TITLE THEME")

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