Letters: Sexting Michele Norris and Robert Siegel read another response to the story about the trend of sexting — teenagers taking nude pictures of themselves on their cell phones and sending them to others. Friday's response is from the school district that's being sued by the student featured in the piece.
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Letters: Sexting

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Letters: Sexting

Letters: Sexting

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ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Time, now, for your letters. And, actually, today we have just one that we want to share. It is yet another response to our story earlier this week on sexting - that's the trend where teens send each other text messages containing nude photos of themselves or others.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt reported on a sexting incident in the Seattle suburb of Bothell. It involves a 16-year-old student, whose nude photo made its way to the senior class and into the mailbox of the vice principal. Here's an excerpt from the story, starting with parents Ed and Kathy Nielsen.

Mr. ED NIELSEN: And they said, we have pictures of your daughter and another girl naked, do you want to see them? And I said, no, I don't want to see - I don't want to see that.

Ms. KATHY NIELSEN: It was terrifying. I mean, having her picture out there. I mean, she just turned 16, you know. I was just thinking, oh my goodness, how is she going to handle this? You know, how is this going to affect the rest of her life?

CHANA JOFFE-WALT: Things got really complicated after that. Brooke and her friend were suspended from the cheer squad. And then the Nielsens wanted to know, what about the boys or the school administration who shared the photo with other people? Parents reported it to the police. And then they sued, which is where things are now. Brooke and her parents are giving their deposition next week.

SIEGEL: NPR received this response from Mike Patterson, an attorney for the North Shore School District where Brooke is a student. He writes, I would like to point out certain facts not covered in Wednesday's report on sexting. One, the district did not disseminate the photo of the girl. The photo was disseminated by other students. Two, because the girl refused to provide any names of students in possession of the photo, the district was unable to discipline any students for possession of the photo.

Three, the girl violated the school's athletic code, and as a result, was given athletic discipline by the district. And four, the district is now forced to spend already stretched budget resources defending a frivolous lawsuit.

NORRIS: If you think we've missed an important point, we do want to hear from you. Go to npr.org and click on Contact Us at the top of the page.

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