Woman Trapped By Bees Recounts Experience Jeanie Fox of Davie, Fla., and her husband were largely trapped in their house by a huge bee colony that took up residence in the walls of their house. A bee exterminator working pro bono got rid of the hive.
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Woman Trapped By Bees Recounts Experience

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Woman Trapped By Bees Recounts Experience

Woman Trapped By Bees Recounts Experience

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ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

Jeanie Fox is no longer a prisoner of the bees. Ms. Fox and her husband live in Davie, Florida, near Miami. And until Willie the Bee Man came to their assistance, they lived at the mercy of bees.

Jeanie Fox, how bad was it?

Ms. JEANIE FOX: Well, it was pretty bad. We couldn't go in the backyard or vacuum the floor.

SIEGEL: Or vacuum the floor?

Ms. FOX: Yeah.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. FOX: That's how I noticed them, really. I was at my sewing machine, and the motor from the sewing machine caused them to get agitated, and I heard them in the walls.

SIEGEL: When you would hear the bees inside the walls, what did the noise they make sound like?

Ms. FOX: It sounded like water running inside the walls.

SIEGEL: Like a shh kind of sound?

Ms. FOX: Yeah, uh-huh. It was all the bees buzzing around, trying to protect the queen.

SIEGEL: Jeanie, how many bees were there in and around your house?

Ms. FOX: There was 30,000 to 50,000. They said it was the largest bee hive in Broward County. So we pretty much had to stay in the house.

SIEGEL: You stayed in the house because you were being harassed by bees?

Ms. FOX: Yes.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SIEGEL: Well, you know, it's a strange thing. I mean, did you call up an exterminator first and say, can you come and get rid of the bees?

Ms. FOX: Yes, and he said it was going to cost about $500. And I live on disability, and my husband's on Social Security. So we don't have that kind of money, not to spend on bees.

SIEGEL: So you did something, which doesn't sound entirely logical at first, but the more you think about it, it does. You called the cops.

Ms. FOX: Well, no, they were in the neighborhood, and when the officer stopped, I asked him if he could please help me with my bees.

SIEGEL: Yeah, and what did he say?

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. FOX: He laughed. And I told him I was quite serious. So he got out of his car and came and looked. And he said, yes, ma'am, because that's a public hazard.

SIEGEL: So now, enter Willie the Bee Man. How did you…

Ms. FOX: Well, the local police department got - contacted Willie the Bee Man and asked him if he would do it pro bono.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SIEGEL: Yes, right.

Ms. FOX: And he said he would if they would allow the TV cameras.

SIEGEL: So Willie the Bee Man cut a shrewd deal here. He got rid of your bees for free, but he got a tremendous amount of publicity in the process.

Ms. FOX: Oh, yes. He did it - I have about four jars of honey.

SIEGEL: This was leftover from the bees.

Ms. FOX: Yes.

SIEGEL: The honey collected from inside your house, in a sense.

Ms. FOX: Yes. They pulled out a beehive that was about two-foot long.

SIEGEL: And now you've been bee-free for one day.

Ms. FOX: Yes and it's wonderful. I let my little dogs outside to play.

(Soundbite of laughter)

SIEGEL: Well, congratulations and thank you very much for talking with us about it.

Ms. FOX: Thank you very, very much.

SIEGEL: That is Jeanie Fox of Davie, Florida, who is now living in all of her own house and no longer afraid of the bees.

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