Letters: Dual-Flush Toilets, Auto Coverage Listeners respond to the story on efforts to reduce water consumption in California by using lower flow toilets, and thoughts on the coverage of the automakers' financial difficulties compared with the coverage of the financial industry. Melissa Block and Michele Norris read from listeners' comments.
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Letters: Dual-Flush Toilets, Auto Coverage

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Letters: Dual-Flush Toilets, Auto Coverage

Letters: Dual-Flush Toilets, Auto Coverage

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  • Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Time now for your letters.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

We received a comment from Eric Moore(ph) of Phoenix, Arizona about our coverage of the auto industry's troubles, and the Obama administration's response to them. Contrasting that with the media coverage of the government's bailout of the financial industry, Mr. Moore writes, those who shower before work receive much less scrutiny from decision makers, from the media and sadly, from NPR, despite the fact that the overall economy is in dire straits, because of their decisions.

BLOCK: And he adds, those who shower after work are less to blame for the financial mess, but held more accountable.

NORRIS: Yesterday's story on advances in consuming less water…

(Soundbite of toilet flush)

NORRIS: …also got a fair amount of attention.

BLOCK: Some were put off by the report, especially reporter Karen Grigsby Bates' suggestion that designers might model waterless urinals after tree trunks to increase male acceptance of the environmentally friendly device.

NORRIS: And there was this comment from Priscilla Perkins of Oak Park, Illinois. She said, made me blush for my 11-year-old son who was listening with me. What an obnoxious and inappropriate wisecrack in an otherwise useful story.

BLOCK: On the other hand, Michael Sebastian, who works in El Segundo, California, where the story was reported, was amused. He found it not only informative, but flush with cheeky commentary. And he wouldn't mind if we provide more programs awash with such unsterile humor.

NORRIS: Well, let us know how things sound to you. Visit our Web site, go to NPR.org and click on Contact Us.

BLOCK: Finally, a request to our listeners, I'll be going back to southwestern China at the end of the month to report on what's happened in the year since the devastating earthquake in Sichuan last May. If you have ideas about people you think we should talk to there, about projects that are underway, communities we should visit or questions you'd like answered, I'd love to hear from you. You can send your ideas to us at NPR.org. Again, click on Contact Us at the top of the page. And please put the word China in the subject line.

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