'Deadliest Catch' Boat Docks In Seattle A group of crab fishermen has brought the Sea Star, an old crab boat featured on the Discovery Channel show, to Seattle's fishermen's harbor, put a gift shop on the back deck and gone into business. They're trying to cash in on their reality show fame.
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'Deadliest Catch' Boat Docks In Seattle

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'Deadliest Catch' Boat Docks In Seattle

'Deadliest Catch' Boat Docks In Seattle

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

For many reality TV fans it doesn't getting any better than Discovery Channel's "Deadliest Catch." You know, the one about crab fishermen in Alaska.

(Soundbite of TV show, "Deadliest Catch")

Mr. MIKE ROWE (Narrator, "Deadliest Catch"): Come hell or high water Captain Keith plans to fish as he's 100,000 pounds shy of catching his quota.

INSKEEP: The show is in its fifth season and some of those crab fishermen are thinking about the future. They are fishing for tourists. NPR's Martin Kaste sends us the latest episode from Seattle.

(Soundbite of music)

MARTIN KASTE: A cloudy day dawns over Seattle's Fisherman's Terminal. For the crew of the Sea Star it's an ominous sign.

Mr. KENNY HENDRICKS (Deck boss, Sea Star): Typical rainy Seattle days - doesn't do a lot for the tourist business.

KASTE: In this game the weather can make you and it can break you. Just yesterday a downpour canceled two bus tours. And right now the boat's main attraction is a deckhand.

Mr. HENDRICKS: Yeah, I'm Kenny Hendricks, deck boss, number one man of the Geritol brigade on the Sea Star in the first season.

KASTE: Hendricks is a good guy, but he's not going to bring out the big crowds. If this crew wants to make money today it needs more star power. In the onboard gift shop manager Mike Day gets word of an impending visit by one of the captains from the show.

Mr. MIKE DAY (Manager, gift shop): Any time we have any of the captains down here it just goes bonkers. It's going to be a good day. I feel it I in my bones.

KASTE: And sure enough, just as the sun breaks through the clouds the fans start showing up.

Unidentified Woman #1: How much is it?

Mr. DAY: You guys want to take the tour?

Unidentified Woman #1: Yeah.

Mr. DAY: $10 adults, $7.50 for juniors and seniors.

KASTE: But then, disaster.

Unidentified Woman #1: How old is a senior?

Mr. DAY: Sixty.

KASTE: Seniors get a 25 percent discount.

Mr. DAY: Are you a senior, ma'am?

Unidentified Woman #2: I'm what?

Mr. DAY: Are you a senior?

Unidentified Woman #2: Yeah.

Unidentified Woman #3: Well, I hope so.

KASTE: This is going to put a big dent in the day's haul.

(Soundbite of seagulls)

The Sea Star's crew is used to adversity. Ever since they set up here in Seattle's Fisherman's Terminal they've had to endure a lot of guff. Kenny Hendricks says the old Norwegian fishermen who drink coffee all day in the café are the worst.

Mr. HENDRICKS: One of the old timers actually saw me in my overalls here last week and he went, Oh, you don't look like much of a movie star dressed that way.

KASTE: But today things are looking good.

(Soundbite of music)

Celebrity Captain Phil Harris pulls up in a red Corvette, parking it right on the dock. Snakeskin boots and a lit cigarette, he's not in a talkative mood, but that's OK. The fans just want to take a look at him, get their pictures with him and maybe buy a pound of the coffee he sells on the side: Captain Phil's Deadliest Brew.

(Soundbite of music)

Martin Kaste, NPR News, at Seattle's deadliest tourist trap.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: This is NPR News.

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