Slain Sunni Political Leader Laid To Rest In Iraq A prominent Iraqi reform politician was buried Saturday in Baghdad. Harith al-Obeidi was gunned down after delivering a sermon at a mosque during Friday prayers. He was the leader of the largest Sunni bloc in parliament and had spoken out repeatedly against the abuse of prisoners in Iraqi prisons.
NPR logo

Slain Sunni Political Leader Laid To Rest In Iraq

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/105374144/105374134" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Slain Sunni Political Leader Laid To Rest In Iraq

Slain Sunni Political Leader Laid To Rest In Iraq

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/105374144/105374134" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(Soundbite of music)

GUY RAZ, host:

RAZ: That's the sound from Baghdad today where mourners laid to rest the leader of the largest Sunni Arab political block. Harith al-Obeidi was gunned down yesterday at a West Baghdad mosque. He's just delivered a sermon demanding that the Iraqi government respect human rights.

NPR's Quil Lawrence reports from Iraq on a fallen political reformer.

QUIL LAWRENCE: Harith al-Obeidi was a professor of Islamic jurisprudence before he became a member of parliament. Colleagues said his gentle and friendly manner helped bring together disparate political factions and got him selected as the head of Tawafoq, the largest Sunni voting block. But he was not soft-spoken about the rights of detainees in Iraq's prison system, the subject of his sermon yesterday.

(Soundbite of Harith al-Obeidi's sermon)

Mr. HARITH AL-OBEIDI: (Foreign Language Spoken).

LAWRENCE: You should put your god in front of you to decide the fate of the thousands of innocent prisoners in the jails, Obeidi said. Only moments later, as Obeidi left the podium surrounded by guards, a young man drew near and shot him in the back of the head. Details are confusing about what happened next, but four others died as the killer tried to escape. He was shot by guards and died while detonating a hand grenade.

Associates of Mr. Obeidi said the murder must have been well organized to get through high security around the mosque and the neighborhood. Colleagues in parliament said the killing aimed to stifle dissent. Shatha al-Obosi worked with Obeidi on the parliament's human rights committee.

Ms. SHATHA AL-OBOSI (Member of Tawafog Human Rights Committee): I memorized what he say. He - every time he say we must solve the problem of the detainees, we must solve the problem with the, you know, mass graves, because the people didn't know their sons, if they're still alive or not.

LAWRENCE: Obeidi quickly became one of the most important advocates for human rights in the government. His selection as leader of the Sunni block suggested a new willingness to move toward reconciliation after ethnic and sectarian bloodshed. Iraq needed him badly, Obosi said.

Ms. AL-OBOSI: Nobody can replace him, nobody. And everybody like him, Shiites and - or Kurds, everybody like him, because very, very few people have a character like him.

(Soundbite of chanting)

LAWRENCE: Mourners chanted as they laid Harith al-Obeidi to rest and condolences arrived from the Iraqi president and prime minister, as well as American officials. Obeidi was 47 years old and the father of eight children.

Quil Lawrence, NPR News, Baghdad.

(Soundbite of music)

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.