In Defense Of The Flag (Sewn For History Class) Bob Heft, who sewed the 50-state flag as a high schooler, received a B- for his project. Heft's history teacher accused him of not knowing how many states were in the union at the time. The teacher changed the grade when the design was accepted by Congress.
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In Defense Of The Flag (Sewn For History Class)

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In Defense Of The Flag (Sewn For History Class)

In Defense Of The Flag (Sewn For History Class)

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DAVID GREENE, Host:

As we head into this Independence Day weekend, we'll hear how the U.S. got the current version of its flag. The tale comes from the StoryCorps project, where 67-year-old Bob Heft recorded an interview. Heft designed the 50-star flag when he was a high school junior. The only problem was, there were only 48 states at the time. But Heft had a hunch that two more states would be added soon.

BOB HEFT: I was really - I was upset. The teacher said, if you don't like the grade, get it accepted in Washington, then come back and see me. I might consider changing the grade.

GREENE: And so I have the grade book - it's encased in plastic that's kept in a bank. My teacher - and he said, I guess if it is good enough for Washington, it's good enough for me. I hereby change the grade to an A.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: His interview will be archived with all of the others at the Library of Congress. You can get the podcast at NPR.org.

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