Man Pays For Stop Sign Stolen 35 Years Ago A young man stole a stop sign in Salt Lake City 35 years ago. An official with Utah's Department of Transportation said they had received a check for $600, along with a letter apologizing for the deed. The writer added that he'd prayed no one was injured. He may find comfort in knowing his money will just about cover the cost of three new stop signs.
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Man Pays For Stop Sign Stolen 35 Years Ago

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Man Pays For Stop Sign Stolen 35 Years Ago

Man Pays For Stop Sign Stolen 35 Years Ago

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Our last word in business today is restitution. In Salt Lake City, a young man stole a stop sign - an irritating, if typical teenage prank. Still, the deed troubled him. So he decided to set things right. It did take him 35 years, but no matter. Last week, an official with Utah's Department of Transportation said the department had received a check for $600, along with a letter apologizing for the deed. The writer added that he prayed no one was injured. He may find comfort in knowing that his money will just about cover the cost of three new stop signs.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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