Passenger Fixes Plane's Mechanical Troubles It's a moment weary vacationers stuck on a plane can only dream about. Passengers on a plane in Spain — headed for Britain — were told the flight would be delayed for at least eight hours due to a mechanical problem. Turns out, a licensed aircraft engineer was on the plane. He fixed the problem, and the flight ended up only being 35 minutes late.
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Passenger Fixes Plane's Mechanical Troubles

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Passenger Fixes Plane's Mechanical Troubles

Passenger Fixes Plane's Mechanical Troubles

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. It's a moment weary vacationers stuck on a plane can only dream about. Last weekend, a plane in Spain headed for Britain got the bad news that it would be delayed for eight hours due to a mechanical problem, until a passenger stepped forward, a licensed aircraft engineer, it turned out. Thirty-five minutes later the plane took off. Another passenger told the BBC it was reassuring that the person who had fixed it was still on the plane.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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