Letters: Life After Prison, Health Care Listeners comment on past show topics, including the difficulties of living a life after prison, whether patients are the problem in the health care system, and the often ignored cases of men victimized by their wives and girlfriends.
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Letters: Life After Prison, Health Care

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Letters: Life After Prison, Health Care

Letters: Life After Prison, Health Care

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NEAL CONAN, host:

It's Tuesday, the day we read from your emails and Web comments. On the Opinion Page yesterday, Dr. Ned Holstein argued that all too often we ignore cases of domestic violence when men are the victims.

Sheila Addison(ph) is a therapist in Oakland, California, who deals with cases of violence: I applaud the interest in going beyond the male perp/female victim binary, at the same time I don't want to lose sight of the fact that women are killed by male partners at an exponentially higher rate than vice versa. Women are most likely to be murdered by their intimate partners. While the recent female perp/male victim story in the news is drawing attention to the exception, the reality is far more complex than women and men started at equal rates.

If you were listening last hour, we talked about the debate over health care and asked, are insurance companies the problem, last week we asked the same question about ourselves: Are patients the problem?

Maria Gonzales(ph) emailed from San Antonio, Texas, to say maybe: As a patient, I find this question something of a dilemma. I recently noticed my own speech abnormalities developing and of course feared the worst. My primary doctor looked at me somewhat incredulously and said it was most likely stress related, but asked frankly if I would feel better having an MRI. As predicted, the MRI was normal. On one hand, I am one of those patients that requests unnecessary tests. On the other hand, if I did not seek my other options and stand up for myself and my concerns, what would that say about my care for my own health.

The idea that $20 gas might be a good thing was a stretch for many listeners. Chris Steiner argues in his new book that prices up to $20 per gallon could have more benefits than drawbacks.

Lewis Jennings(ph) in Anchorage wrote, he doesn't buy it: Here in Alaska, almost all our food is transported by ocean and truck. The majority of transportation is by air and almost all electricity and heat in rural Alaska is kerosene derived. At $20 a gallon, it would no longer be possible to live in most parts of Alaska.

Another listener is a bit more optimistic: I'm starting an electric car conversion company. Higher gas prices will drive many people toward my products. I look forward to it. That from Josh(ph) in Rochester, Minnesota.

Finally, life beyond bars. We heard from many of you about the difficulties of rebuilding a life after prison. C.M.(ph) wrote to tell us, I can relate: I am also a convicted felon. My crime was committed almost nine years ago. I spent a year in county jail and am very fortunate to have a family to take me in after. I immediately went to college and finished my associate's degree with full intentions on finishing my B.A. with an emphasis in adult education, so I could go back and help women complete their education. Unfortunately, I did not complete the degree because I realized that I would not be hired because of my felony. I have recently started school for veterinary technician only to come face to face with the same challenge of getting licensed.

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