Letters: Insect Songs; Axis of Evil; Wick's Passing Liane Hansen reads letters from listeners, including comments on last week's feature on the Songs of Insects, touring the Axis of Evil, and a note from Zeno Wicks III telling us that his father has died. We spoke to Zeno Wicks Jr. last month; he described witnessing the Hindenberg crash 70 years ago.
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Letters: Insect Songs; Axis of Evil; Wick's Passing

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Letters: Insect Songs; Axis of Evil; Wick's Passing

Letters: Insect Songs; Axis of Evil; Wick's Passing

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

Time now for your letters and we received many about our segment on the Songs of Insects. The one from Amy Gamborin(ph) in Austin, Texas made us chuckle. Thanks from me and my cat, Shine(ph), who sat riveted, staring at my computer speakers listening to crickets she could only dream of chasing. It was tremendously entertaining for both of us.

Then there was our conversation with Tony Wheeler. He's the author of the "Lonely Planet Guidebook - Bad Lands: A Tourist on the Axis of Evil." Regina Pikety(ph) of New York writes, I returned from a 15-day tour to Iran on May 7th. The most striking feature of this visit was the friendliness of the Iranian people. I thought that the young people were not being thought to hate us. We should treat Iran with more respect.

And on Thursday, we received a note from Zeno Wicks Jr. His father, Zeno Wicks Jr. appeared on our program last month to talk about the day he witnessed the crash of the Hindenburg in 1937. Zeno Wicks Jr. then was 16 years old. He'd gone to Lakehurst, New Jersey with his father.

Mr. ZENO WICKS JR. (Witness, Hindenburg Crash): We were - I'm guessing half a mile or a mile from the field when we saw it.

HANSEN: And you saw it explode?

Mr. WICKS JR.: Yeah.

HANSEN: What do you remember about that moment?

Mr. WICKS JR.: Well, first of all, let me remind you that was 70 years ago and I'm...

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. WICKS JR.: ...but, what I remember is we saw the ship coming in and then it just burst into flames and. And dad drove right on up to the field and he got out, swearing loudly and he told me in no uncertain terms to stay in the car.

HANSEN: Zeno Wicks' son wrote to inform us that his father passed away on Wednesday. He also said his dad was a long-time fan of NPR and had even submitted an essay to This I Believe this year. That essay started with these words: I believe that I have the responsibility to leave this world a little better than I found it. Zeno Wicks went on to describe the volunteer work he and his wife did throughout their lives and how they raised their six children to have the same beliefs. He wrote, a daughter was in the Peace Corps in Ghana and a son in Burkina Faso. I just got the best Christmas gift ever. The kids sent money to a woman in a Burkina Faso village to buy a cow. Now, there is a cow in Africa named Zeno. It seems that Zeno Wicks Jr. lived his beliefs. Our condolences to his family.

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