A center dedicated to Bob Dylan prepares to open in Oklahoma The Bob Dylan Center opens in Tulsa on Tuesday. It contains more than 100,000 pieces from his archives.

A center dedicated to Bob Dylan prepares to open in Oklahoma

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Bob Dylan fans can book their trips now. A museum called the Bob Dylan Center opens tomorrow in Tulsa, Okla.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE TIMES THEY ARE A-CHANGIN'")

BOB DYLAN: (Singing) Come writers and critics who prophesize with your pen.

INSKEEP: Dylan was born in Minnesota, and he came up through the New York City folk scene. So who would have prophesized that this center would be in Tulsa?

A MARTINEZ, HOST:

Well, Steven Jenkins is the director of the Bob Dylan Center. And he says in part, it's because Tulsa is also where you'll find a shrine to another legendary folk musician, the Woody Guthrie Center.

STEVEN JENKINS: And of course, Dylan always saw Guthrie as a formative influence and felt that, you know, if my materials are going to be anywhere, why not on the same block as Guthrie's?

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SONG TO WOODY")

DYLAN: (Singing) Hey, hey, Woody Guthrie. I wrote you a song.

INSKEEP: Quite a few, in fact. Inside, visitors will find the many artifacts and personal papers that Dylan gave the center.

JENKINS: This is a 100,000 items, give or take.

(SOUNDBITE OF BOB DYLAN SONG, "TANGLED UP IN BLUE")

JENKINS: We have handwritten notebooks where you see the earliest versions of the song lyrics that went into, say, the "Blood On The Tracks" album, which really provide a whole new window into Dylan's creative process.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "TANGLED UP IN BLUE")

DYLAN: (Singing) Early one morning, the sun was shining. I was laying in bed, wondering if she'd changed it all, if her hair was still red.

MARTINEZ: Fans can also get hands-on access to his music.

JENKINS: We have an experience here that's very much like a recording studio. You can take a song like "Like A Rolling Stone," we can separate out that song into its individual tracks. And in a sense, visitors can play engineer. So you can hear the organ that Al Kooper played...

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIKE A ROLLING STONE")

DYLAN: (Singing) How does it feel...

JENKINS: ...Or you can choose to focus on Dylan's voice.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIKE A ROLLING STONE")

DYLAN: (Singing) ...To be without a home like a complete unknown?

MARTINEZ: And thing is, though, don't expect Bob Dylan himself to drop by. Steven Jenkins says once Dylan parted with his archives, he really had very little input.

JENKINS: It's not so much his style. You know, this is someone who famously espoused the don't-look-back philosophy, right? He's more interested in tomorrow night's show. It's not so much his nature to look back.

INSKEEP: You, however, can look back all you want.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "GOING, GOING, GONE")

DYLAN: (Singing) I'm closing the book on the pages and the text. And I don't really care, oh, what happens next.

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