Nigerian Artist is a One-Man Body Beating Band Nigerian artist Joseph Omotoye, known as Jojo Bodybeats, uses his entire body — including his mouth, lips, shoulder, chest, stomach and a spoon beaten against his cheeks — to make extraordinary "body music."
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Nigerian Artist is a One-Man Body Beating Band

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Nigerian Artist is a One-Man Body Beating Band

Nigerian Artist is a One-Man Body Beating Band

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DEBBIE ELLIOTT, host:

Take a listen to this one-man beatbox.

(Soundbite of beatboxing)

ELLIOTT: He comes from Nigeria and goes by the name Jojo Bodybeats. NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton was so captivated by his performance in Lagos, she went backstage to find out just how he makes all those sounds with his body. She sent this postcard.

(Soundbite of beatboxing)

OFEIBEA QUIST-ARCTON: If that was the buzz, and what about the drums?

JOJO BODYBEATS a.k.a. JOSEPH OMOTOYE (Nigerian Artist): The drums?

(Soundbite of beatboxing)

QUIST-ARCTON: In that drumming, you were hitting…

JOJO BOBYBEATS: Yeah.

QUIST-ARCTON: …between your shoulder and your chest.

JOJO BOBYBEATS: Shoulder and the chest and the tummy because I can draw so many sounds from my tummy here. I have enough concentration performing beats, drums and rhythms from the system. And I find it so easy, comfortable.

QUIST-ARCTON: Right. Now, let me hear that tummy.

(Soundbite of beatboxing)

JOJO BOBYBEATS: You've got to belt (unintelligible). You've got to belt. Dance to the rhythm.

QUIST-ARCTON: How much practice does these all take, Jojo Bodybeats?

JOJO BOBYBEATS: Well, I practice every day. If I'm alone I do it, when doing something else or eating. Unfortunately, I…

(Soundbite of beatboxing)

JOJO BOBYBEATS: I always eat this rhythm. I mean, always ate this rhythm, oh, I drink to the rhythm. My life is more than music.

(Soundbite of beatboxing)

JOJO BOBYBEATS: When you listen to this sounds that's coming from my body, people always love it. And praise the Lord for it because God is (unintelligible) want this in my system, yeah, to make people happy when you hear Jojo Bodybeat doing the sound.

(Soundbite of beatboxing)

JOJO BOBYBEATS: Do it. Do it. Do it.

QUIST-ARCTON: All right. What if you have to sneeze?

JOJO BOBYBEATS: You've got to sneeze to the rhythm.

(Soundbite of sneezing)

JOJO BOBYBEATS: Easy.

(Soundbite of sneezing)

JOJO BOBYBEATS: You just be careful.

(Soundbite of sneezing)

JOJO BOBYBEATS: Those (unintelligible).

(Soundbite of laughter)

QUIST-ARCTON: So you even have to sneeze in time and in tuned and in rhythm.

JOJO BOBYBEATS: Honestly.

(Soundbite of beatboxing)

QUIST-ARCTON: So you did the one thing we haven't had.

JOJO BOBYBEATS: No.

QUIST-ARCTON: Which was what made everybody's head swivel and pay attention.

JOJO BOBYBEATS: Yeah.

(Soundbite of beatboxing)

QUIST-ARCTON: I have to tell you as this happens. You know what he's using? He's using his hands, his fingers, slapping them against his cheek, sort of making an O with his mouth, and this is the sound that comes out. Listen.

(Soundbite of beatboxing)

QUIST-ARCTON: And that sounded like "London Bridge is Falling Down," doesn't it?

Jojo Bodybeats, thank you very much.

JOJO BOBYBEATS: It's a pleasure. Ciao.

ELLIOTT: Nigeria's Jojo Bodybeats, whose real name is Joseph Omotoye, performing for NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton.

(Soundbite of beatboxing)

ELLIOTT: That's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Debbie Elliott.

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