Norwegian, Swedish Men Do More Housework A new study ranks Norwegian men, and their Swedish counterparts, as most likely to help with housework and childcare. An economist at Britain's Oxford University compared male attitudes in various countries toward housework and childcare. According to the "helpful husband" ranking, men from Norway and Sweden helped the most with household chores. At the bottom of the list are men from Japan, Germany and Australia.
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Norwegian, Swedish Men Do More Housework

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Norwegian, Swedish Men Do More Housework

Norwegian, Swedish Men Do More Housework

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

It may not just be the law that's giving Norwegian women a boost in the workplace, because our last word in business today is Norwegian men. A new study ranks Norwegian men and their Swedish counterparts as most likely to help with the housework and childcare. An economist at Britain's Oxford University wanted to compare male attitudes in various countries toward housework, so she interviewed more than 13,000 men and women in a dozen industrialized countries and came up with a helpful-husband ranking.

After Norway and Sweden, then came Britain and the United States. We made the top four. At the bottom of the ranking - meaning the places where a man is least likely to wash the dishes or change a diaper - are Japan and Germany. In dead last: Australia.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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