Young Journalist Gets His Obama Interview After months of trying, 11-year-old student journalist Damon Weaver lands the biggest interview of his young career: President Obama.
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Young Journalist Gets His Obama Interview

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Young Journalist Gets His Obama Interview

Young Journalist Gets His Obama Interview

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MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Landing an interview with President Obama is no easy task.

MADELEINE BRAND, host:

Damon Weaver would know. The 11-year-old student journalist from Pahokee, Florida, has been trying for almost a year. In that time, the sixth-grader has made a name for himself by scoring one big-ticket interview after another.

Mr. DAMON WEAVER (Sixth-Grader, Canal Point Elementary School): Hi. I'm Damon Weaver, and I'm here with Senator Joe Biden.

Hi. I'm here with Colin Powell.

Hi. I'm here with LL Cool J, and he's a rapper…

BLOCK: But sitting down with the president is Damon's dream. And as he told our co-host, Robert Siegel, he has employed some pretty clever strategies to reel in Mr. Obama.

(Soundbite of archived broadcast)

Mr. WEAVER: At one time, when we was at this Barack Obama event in Miami - we were at the University of Miami - I made this big sign that say, can I interview you?

ROBERT SIEGEL:

Can I interview you? Uh-huh.

Mr. WEAVER: Yes. I don't believe he saw it, but I didn't get an interview.

SIEGEL: That must have been the problem.

BRAND: Well, yesterday, he got his big get.

Mr. WEAVER: Hi. I'm Damon Weaver, and I'm here at the White House to interview President Obama about education.

BLOCK: The two spoke for about 10 minutes, hitting on everything from school funding to school lunches.

Mr. WEAVER: I suggest that we have French fries and mangoes every day for lunch.

President BARACK OBAMA: See, you know, and if you were planning the lunch program, it'd probably taste good to you, but it might not make you big and strong like you need to be.

BRAND: Damon capped off the interview with a simple request.

Mr. WEAVER: When I interviewed Vice President Joe Biden, he became my homeboy. Now that I interviewed you, would you like to become my homeboy?

Pres. OBAMA: Absolutely.

BRAND: That's 11-year-old Damon Weaver, giving President Obama the hard questions at the White House yesterday.

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