Tired of Paris and Lindsay? Try the Sports Pages There's plenty of hand-wringing over our celebrity-obsessed culture. But what about all the time and attention paid to sports? Commentator Frank Deford says it's far better to escape to the sports pages than the gossip magazines.
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Tired of Paris and Lindsay? Try the Sports Pages

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Tired of Paris and Lindsay? Try the Sports Pages

Tired of Paris and Lindsay? Try the Sports Pages

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Commentator Frank Deford has thinking about the way that you've been spending your spare time and your brain cells.

FRANK DEFORD: Actually - although God knows this irony surely didn't occur to Mr. Gore - he was really unintentionally singling out women. Yes, to it is they - far more than men - who tune in the celebrity programs and buy the gossip magazines. And oh, please, neither am I dumb enough to castigate eight women en masse, but I do think that a proportionate devotion to sports - a population which numbers more men by far - is a healthier escape than the predilection for dunking into the world of bull face.

INSKEEP: This doesn't absolve the many abuses in sport. It doesn't excuse the fans who impart too much of their lives to a mere diversion. It does, though, distinguish sport and elevate it above our other popular entertainments.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Our celebrity commentator is Frank Deford. His new novel is "The Entitled: a Story of Baseball, Celebrity, and Scandal." He joins us each Wednesday from member station WSHU in Fairfield, Connecticut. You hear him on MORNING EDITION From NPR News. I'm Steven Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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