Letters: Ted Kennedy And Hurricane Katrina Talk of the Nation listeners comment on the death and legacy of Sen. Edward Kennedy, the impact of Hurricane Katrina four years after the storm devastated the Gulf Coast, and the history of the rare act of making an unassisted triple play in baseball.
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Letters: Ted Kennedy And Hurricane Katrina

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Letters: Ted Kennedy And Hurricane Katrina

Letters: Ted Kennedy And Hurricane Katrina

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NEAL CONAN, host:

It's Tuesday and time to read from your e-mails and Web comments.

It's four years since Hurricane Katrina ripped into the Gulf Coast. And last week, we asked those of you affected by the storm to tell us how it changed your lives.

Ann Barnett(ph) e-mailed from Oakland to tell us: My mother lives in the tiny Mississippi coastal town where Katrina made landfall. Waveland was virtually wiped out. How it changed our lives? Each of her daughters built or fixed up rooms in our houses as warm, cozy, comfortable, happy places for her. We're getting away from insurance paperwork, communal FEMA trailers and the unhappy aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. This made us treasure our mother all the more as we've watched the profound optimism, joy and persistence she has shown in dealing with this tragedy. I can't think of anyone I admire more.

We also remembered Senator Ted Kennedy. Many of you had stories of your own. You may remember that Senator Kennedy's son, Teddy Jr., suffered from bone cancer as a child. One of his legs was amputated.

S.I.(ph) sent us this story: A close friend of mine learned that his child also had the same kind of cancer. Aware of the story of Ted's son, my friend picked up the phone and called him. Senator Kennedy did not know my friend but talked to him at length. Having an intelligent, caring person to talk to who clearly had access to the very best medical advice was both helpful and comforting at this difficult time. Periodically, Ted Kennedy would call my friend to ask how his child was doing. The family will never forget this kindness.

Many listeners also remembered the events at Chappaquiddick. And like Kristine Ashpul(ph) in Illinois wondered: Why are we looking at Teddy as a hero? What about that fateful night in the car back in 1969? This canonizing of him is ridiculous.

And finally, a little baseball trivia. I mentioned last week's unassisted triple play, only the second in Major League history to end a ball game. I also mentioned another rarity when a single hitter belts two grand slams in a single game to which Joe Dulay(ph), a listener in Boston, upped the ante.

In 2003, Bill Miller, our former third basemen, not only hit two grand slams in one game and not only hit them in back-to-back at bats, he hit one righty and one lefty. Not only a rarity but unique in baseball history. And not that I want to pilot on, but he also hit a third homer in that game.

Not bad - even for a Red Sox.

If you have comments, questions or corrections for us, the best way to reach us is by e-mail. The address is talk@npr.org. Please let us know where you're writing from and give us some help on how to pronounce your name.

And tomorrow: What's it like to be a baby? Alison Gopnik says everything we know about infants is wrong. Join us then.

This is TALK OF THE NATION from NPR News. I'm Neal Conan in Washington.

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