Movie Review - Capitalism: A Love Story - Michael Moore's Latest Target Is The System Itself Michael Moore is famous for skewering the excesses of American industry — and in his latest film, he goes looking (mostly on Wall Street) for the source of the trouble. Critic Kenneth Turan says that while Capitalism certainly has spirit, the pop-culture polemicist may have taken on more than he could chew.
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Michael Moore's New Target: 'Capitalism' Itself

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Michael Moore's New Target: 'Capitalism' Itself

Review

Movies

Michael Moore's New Target: 'Capitalism' Itself

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A L: A Love Story" examines the causes of the recession. Los Angeles Times and MORNING EDITION film critic Kenneth Turan has this review.

KENNETH TURAN: "Capitalism: A Love Story" is more than Michael Moore's latest documentary. It's the summation of the movies he's been making for the past 20 years. He lays all the ills of American society at the feet of an out-of- control free-market system. He so detests it, he puts priests on camera to talk about capitalism as morally evil.

(SOUNDBITE OF DOCUMENTARY, "CAPITALISM: A LOVE STORY")

MICHAEL MOORE: We are here to get the money back for the American people.

TURAN: Moore has not lost his provocateur's gift for stirring the pot. But "Capitalism: A Love Story" misses the narrower focus that gave his earlier films some of their punch. Capitalism is such a huge topic that touching a wide variety of bases may be inevitable, but it's still distracting.

(SOUNDBITE OF DOCUMENTARY, "CAPITALISM: A LOVE STORY")

MOORE: Fill it up. I got more bags. Ten billion probably won't fit in here. We want our money back.

TURAN: Perhaps the most startling thing about capitalism is that Michael Moore stands revealed, not as some pointy-headed socialist, but as an unreconstructed New Deal Democrat. He admires Franklin D. Roosevelt and feels that the decades-long weakening of unions has fatally weakened America. The fact that this will be a controversial stance says as much about today's political culture as it does about Moore's place in it.

: To see clips from Michael Moore's latest film, go to npr.org. Kenneth Turan reviews movies for MORNING EDITION and The Los Angeles Times.

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