Can You Believe These Rankings? Sports has always loved rankings, says commentator Frank Deford. But what do the rankings really mean? The latest brouhaha is in women's tennis, where Serena Williams, who's won three of the last four Grand Slams, is ranked No. 2 after a player who's won none.
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Can You Believe These Rankings?

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Can You Believe These Rankings?

Can You Believe These Rankings?

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Now that college football is under way, coaches and sportswriters everywhere are busy ranking teams everywhere. Commentator Frank Deford says rank has its problems.

FRANK DEFORD: As a consequence, when the U.S. Open began last week, Dinara Safina was ranked number one, even though she's never won a Grand Slam tournament, while Serena Williams, who's won three of the last four Grand Slams, was, ridiculously, ranked number two. And, sure enough, Safina lost in just the third round. Apparently, choking is the other 20 percent of life.

S: Serena will still remain number two in the goofy rankings, even if she wins the Open once again. She's hard-boiled, she's a fierce competitor, but then, as her shirt said the other day - can't spell dynasty without nasty.

MONTAGNE: Commentator Frank Deford joins us each Wednesday from member station WSHU in Fairfield, Connecticut.

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