The Last Cup - Messi's Final Shot : La última copa/The Last Cup NPR and Futuro Studios present The Last Cup, a limited series about soccer and the immigrant experience, starting November 10th.

Lionel Messi is known as the best soccer player of his generation, but there's one dream he's never achieved: winning a World Cup for Argentina, the country he left decades ago.

What does home mean when you are so far away, for so long?

All episodes will be released in English and Spanish.

Introducing The Last Cup

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JASMINE GARSD, HOST:

I'm going to tell you the story of one of the best soccer players that has ever lived, the Superman of soccer.

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE)

UNIDENTIFIED COMMENTATOR #1: Pick your poison. It's Messi.

UNIDENTIFIED COMMENTATOR #2: He did it.

UNIDENTIFIED COMMENTATOR #1: And it's goal.

UNIDENTIFIED COMMENTATOR #3: Here he is again. It's astonishing.

UNIDENTIFIED COMMENTATOR #4: Lionel Messi.

UNIDENTIFIED COMMENTATOR #3: Oh, my goodness.

UNIDENTIFIED COMMENTATOR #4: Lionel Messi does it again. He's superhuman.

GARSD: Lionel Messi has a record number of goals in the Spanish League and the most Ballon d'Ors of any soccer player ever.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: You see Lionel Messi on a team, and you expect that team to win every single time.

GARSD: But there's one thing he's never been able to do. He's never won a World Cup.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARSD: Messi has spent most of his record-breaking career playing in Europe, but whenever he'd come home to Argentina and put on the national team jersey, it's like he lost his superpowers.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED COMMENTATOR #5: Lionel Messi. No, no, no. No, no, no. It's gone away. It's gone away.

GARSD: But every time it got away, a lot of people back home got angry.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: (Speaking Spanish).

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #3: (Speaking Spanish).

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: (Speaking Spanish).

GARSD: And as an Argentine myself, as someone who had to leave the country as a kid, this has been hard to watch.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: And that frustration almost broke him. He felt that he was failing the country.

GARSD: This is a different kind of sports story. It's about what it means to leave home and whether or not you can ever really go back. I'm Jasmine Garsd. And this fall, leading up to what will be Messi's last chance to be a world champion, listen to THE LAST CUP from NPR and Futuro Studios.

(Speaking Spanish).

(CHEERING)

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