Letters: Market, Correction, Shofar Listeners respond to Melissa Block's profile of the New Seasons Market in Portland, Ore. They also point to an error in a correction on Friday's show, and respond to last month's interview of shofar player Jenny Litvack, goddaughter of jazz legend Dizzy Gillespie. Melissa Block and Robert Siegel read from listeners' e-mails.
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Letters: Market, Correction, Shofar

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Letters: Market, Correction, Shofar

Letters: Market, Correction, Shofar

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MELISSA BLOCK, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

I'm Robert Siegel, and it's time now for your letters.

BLOCK: Some sharp-eared listeners noted that when we corrected an error on Friday, we made a new one - hate it when that happens.

Mark Mappin(ph) of Highland Park, New Jersey, writes: You stated that the "War of the Worlds" broadcast did not happen in 1934 but rather on Halloween night 1938. You are right on the year, but wrong on the day. The broadcast was on October 30, 1938, the night before Halloween. Mr. Mappin is correct.

SIEGEL: And, finally, a gift that keeps on giving. About a month ago, I interviewed a shofar player. The shofar is a ram's horn that's traditionally blown during the Jewish high holy days. The player was Jenny Litvack, who had a close relationship also with jazz legend Dizzy Gillespie, who regarded her as a kind of goddaughter.

BLOCK: And since that interview, we've gotten some interesting mail from people closely associated with Dizzy Gillespie. And this time around, we heard from his former personal manager. Robert, this comes back to your question. You asked Jenny Litvack whether Dizzy Gillespie himself ever played the shofar.

SIEGEL: Played the shofar, that's right. And she says it's the type of thing that he would do, but she never saw him do it. Well, his personal manager did see it. Charles Fishman writes: In June 1985, Dizzy performed with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra in Jerusalem with Lalo Schifrin conducting, and Mr. Fishman attached a photo of the jazz great playing the shofar at the Western Wall.

BLOCK: And you can see that photo for yourself at npr.org, where you can also toot your own horn by responding to our stories. Just click on contact us.

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