Waiting To See If The Hype Overshadows The iPad Apple computer has unveiled its new iPad tablet. CEO Steve Jobs said the device is better for reading books, playing games and watching video than either a laptop or a smart phone. The first iPads won't hit the market for two more months. However, Apple has released a software development kit so that other companies can create new applications.
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Waiting To See If The Hype Overshadows The iPad

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Waiting To See If The Hype Overshadows The iPad

Waiting To See If The Hype Overshadows The iPad

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T: Frantic Steve Jobs Stays Up All Night Designing Apple Tablet.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

After supposedly forgetting about the announcement until the last minute, Jobs has described gluing nine iPhones onto a cafeteria tray and calling it Apple's new product.

: NPR's Laura Sydell samples some of the reaction.

LAURA SYDELL: Apple CEO Steve Jobs certainly didn't play down all the hype.

STEVE JOBS: We want to kick off 2010 by introducing a truly magical and revolutionary product today.

SYDELL: Jobs and a team of other presenters went on for over an hour and a half about the virtues of the new iPad. Here are some of the basics. It's got a 9.7- inch touch screen. It's got a big virtual keyboard. The iPad connects to iTunes. iTunes will now have a bookstore, and the iPad is a lovely color eReader. There was no major new technology. It got a big ho-hum from some analysts.

JAMES MCQUIVEY: The iPad had the opportunity to create a completely new consumer device category and it didn't.

SYDELL: He has this fantasy: Imagine you are in Paris with the family. You want to send photos to grandma back in New Jersey. McQuivey was hoping grandma could turn on her iPad and - voila, there would be pictures.

MCQUIVEY: So the people across multiple generations are going to say I want an iPad because it helps connect me to my family and my friends in a way that I can't right now. And this device does it.

SYDELL: Not everyone is quite as disappointed as McQuivey. Gartner analyst Michael McGuire points out no one was terribly excited about the first iPod.

MICHAEL MCGUIRE: It grew. They iterated it quickly. And I think we might be looking at that same kind of a cycle.

SYDELL: The first iPads won't hit the market for another two months; however, Apple has released a software development kit so that other companies can create new applications. In that time, McGuire things the right application could make a difference.

MCGUIRE: You could look at this as the first stake in the ground, if you will, as opposed to, well, it didn't meet all of the hype.

SYDELL: Laura Sydell, NPR News, San Francisco.

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