Diddy's Search for Aide Goes Slowly Hip-hop impresario P. Diddy is still inviting applications for a personal assistant job — and using the Web phenomenon YouTube to do it. But after an initial posting, Diddy has returned with pointed advice for the many hopefuls.
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Diddy's Search for Aide Goes Slowly

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Diddy's Search for Aide Goes Slowly

Diddy's Search for Aide Goes Slowly

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Hip-hop mogul Sean "Diddy" Combs did not need an avatar to help him search for a new personal assistant. He posted an ad for the job himself on YouTube.

SEAN COMBS: So what better job than to have me scream at you, have you sleep deprived, keep you up late hours.

INSKEEP: What better job indeed. Thousands of video applications later, Mr. Diddy appeared on YouTube again.

COMBS: What have I started? You have to have some sort of skill set. Know how to read. You've got to know how to write. I hope you know you got to have a college degree.

INSKEEP: It's getting to the point where Mr. Diddy might need an assistant to screen applicants to be his assistant.

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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