Let There Be L-I-G-H-T This is a game of categories. For each one, name something in it starting with each of the letters "L-I-G-H-T" in any order. For example, if the category is two-syllable girls' names, the answer might be "Lila," "Irene," "Georgette," "Holly" and "Tina."
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Let There Be L-I-G-H-T

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Let There Be L-I-G-H-T

Let There Be L-I-G-H-T

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JACKI LYDEN, Host:

And joining us is puzzlemaster Will Shortz. Hi there, Will.

WILL SHORTZ: Hi, Jacki. Great to talk to you again.

LYDEN: Great to talk to you. I understand that you're headed off once more. You're always jetting somewhere.

SHORTZ: Well, this isn't exactly jetting. But...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SHORTZ: ...this weekend is the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament in Brooklyn. It's about an hour from my house. I'll report on it next week. But people can follow the results at CrosswordTournament.com.

LYDEN: Okay. Cool. Now, would you please remind us of the challenge you gave last week?

SHORTZ: Yes. I said take the name Proust, as in the novelist Marcel Proust, P-R-O-U-S-T, using these six letters, repeating them as often as necessary, spell a familiar bumper sticker. Three words, 16 letters all together. What bumper sticker is it?

LYDEN: And in a remembrance of things past, what is the answer, Will?

SHORTZ: The answer is Support Our Troops.

LYDEN: Support Our Troops, great. Well, Will, this week we received over 3,900 entries and that is absolutely massive, as you may know, compared to last week. And out of that whopping amount of entries, our randomly selected winner is Frank Costanza from Manassas, Virginia. And Frank is here in front of me in the studio. Hi there, Frank.

M: Hello.

LYDEN: Thanks for coming in from Manassas. How long have you been playing the puzzle?

M: Probably about 15 years.

LYDEN: And what do you do in Manassas?

M: I am a hardware-software engineer.

LYDEN: And I believe you're also a veteran.

M: Yes. I'm a Marine Corps veteran.

LYDEN: So, fantastic, you got Support Our Troops. How long did that take to get?

M: Approximately 10 seconds. I didn't finish writing down the clue when he said three-word phrase and I said, oh, support our troops.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LYDEN: And I see that you're on the board of directors for the Prince William County Symphony.

M: Yes.

LYDEN: That's great. Well, are you ready to play the puzzle with Will Shortz?

M: Definitely.

LYDEN: And, of course, if you need some help I'm right over here.

M: Okay.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SHORTZ: Number one - in honor of the Winter Olympics - is sports, any sport.

M: Luge.

SHORTZ: Luge, good.

M: Ice skating.

SHORTZ: Ice skating, ice hockey, good.

M: Giant slalom, hockey.

SHORTZ: Giant slalom, okay. Golf also. Hockey, good, yes. And T?

M: And tennis.

SHORTZ: Oh man, that was fast. All right.

LYDEN: Speed of light.

SHORTZ: Here's your next category: parts of a car.

M: Lights, ignition...

SHORTZ: Lights - I'm not going to take lights because that's our word, light. But ignition's good, yeah. Try another L.

LYDEN: Lug nut.

M: There you go, lug nut.

SHORTZ: Lug nut.

M: Gas tank.

SHORTZ: Lock, license plate and left turn signal. Gas tank, good, yes. H and T.

M: Does headlights count?

SHORTZ: Headlights, all right. Also hood.

M: Okay. Hood, taillight.

SHORTZ: Trunk, tachometer, all right.

LYDEN: See, what you don't see is I'm writing all the, hey, I'm writing all these things down and sliding them across the table.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LYDEN: Okay. What else?

SHORTZ: Your next category is islands.

M: Okay. Long Island.

SHORTZ: Yes.

M: Guam, Hawaii.

SHORTZ: Guam, good.

M: Tahiti.

SHORTZ: Yes.

M: Indonesia.

LYDEN: Wait, I have one for you.

SHORTZ: Well, that's a collection of islands.

M: Okay.

SHORTZ: How about a single island?

LYDEN: Think St. Patrick's Day.

M: Oh, Ireland.

SHORTZ: Ireland, yes.

M: That's a country also, yes.

SHORTZ: And Iceland also works. Excellent, man. Well, your next category is things in a hotel room.

M: A lamp.

SHORTZ: Lamp, good.

M: A tub.

SHORTZ: A tub, good.

M: Icebox for...

LYDEN: The ice machine down the hall.

SHORTZ: Ice bucket would work, ironing board or iron. G and H.

LYDEN: G and H. Well...

M: You know, in some of them they have a garden area. You know, like...

SHORTZ: I'm thinking in a room.

M: In a hotel, oh.

LYDEN: In the room, in the room.

M: In the room, in the room.

LYDEN: Leave G alone for a second, but H.

M: Oh.

LYDEN: Rattling my paper. Heater.

M: Heater, okay.

SHORTZ: Heater, hair dryer and hangers would work.

LYDEN: And we need a G.

M: That's a tough one.

SHORTZ: I've got two Gs and one of them might be in a dresser drawer.

LYDEN: Oh, I have it. Gideon...

M: Gideon's Bible.

SHORTZ: Gideon's Bible, yes. Also glasses would work.

M: I was thinking of Bible, but I forgot Gideon.

LYDEN: Thanks for the hint.

SHORTZ: And your last category is synonyms for big.

M: Large, giant...

SHORTZ: Yes, yes.

M: Huge.

SHORTZ: Yes.

M: Tremendous.

SHORTZ: Yes. And I?

M: I is always the tough one.

LYDEN: Oh.

M: Immense.

LYDEN: There we are.

SHORTZ: Immense. Good job. I'm impressed.

LYDEN: I just hummed a few bars and you knew the tune. There we go. Frank, that was an excellent job and it was so much fun to play it in person.

M: Thank you.

LYDEN: I'm sure NPR will be adding a little budget to fly everybody in. That would be great.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LYDEN: Frank, we have something really special for you this week 'cause you're a veteran and the answer to our puzzle this week was Support Our Troops. We have four soldiers who served in Afghanistan and Iraq who have made a music CD. They are called 4 Troops and they're using this CD in a tour to raise money for veterans' charities. They call themselves 4 Troops and they want to present you the prize.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

TROOPS: (Singing) Somewhere a trumpet sounds in the night, a soldier is standing there.

M: For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin.

M: The "Scrabble Deluxe Edition" from Parker Brothers, the book series "Will Shortz Presents KenKen" Volumes 1, 2 and 3 from St. Martin's Press.

M: And one of Will Shortz's "Puzzlemaster Decks of Riddles and Challenges" from Chronicle Books.

M: And a CD compilation of NPR's Sunday puzzles.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

TROOPS: (Singing) And for freedom he'll stand and fight.

LYDEN: So, what do you think, Frank?

M: Oh, fantastic.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LYDEN: Wait till you hear their CD. It's out in May and we had a lot of fun talking to them here in the studio. And before we let you go, please tell us what member station you listen to.

M: WAMU.

LYDEN: Right down the street. Frank Costanza from Manassas.

M: And I'm a member.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LYDEN: Oh, well, I'm happy to hear that. I think you're in the middle of the pledge drive and so they'll be happy to hear it too.

M: Oh, yes. That's - when I got the call, I said maybe this is asking for money.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LYDEN: And, Will, I think Frank was awesome.

SHORTZ: That was amazing.

LYDEN: Will, what's the challenge for next week?

SHORTZ: Take the word Brooklynite, B-R-O-O-K-L-Y-N-I-T-E, rearrange these 11 letters to spell the names of two world capitals. What are they? So again, Brooklynite, rearrange these 11 letters to spell the names of two world capitals. What capitals are they?

LYDEN: It's been a great pleasure.

SHORTZ: Thanks a lot, Jacki.

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